Seasonal fluctuations in weight and self-weighing behavior among adults in a behavioral weight loss intervention

Margaret C. Fahey, Robert C. Klesges, Mehmet Kocak, Gerald W. Talcott, Rebecca Krukowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The current study aimed to observe potential seasonal fluctuations in weight and self-weighing behavior among a diverse sample of adults engaged in a behavioral weight loss intervention. Methods: Active duty personnel (N = 248) were randomized to either a counselor-initiated or self-paced 12-month behavioral weight loss intervention promoting daily self-weighing. Body weight and self-weighing frequency were collected from electronic scales (e-scales) provided at baseline. Results: Overall, participants lost weight from winter to spring (p = 0.02) and gained weight from fall to winter (p < 0.001). No demographic differences in weight changes were observed. Participants self-weighed less frequently during summer compared to spring (p < 0.0001), less in fall compared to summer (p < 0.0001), and less in winter compared to fall (p < 0.0001). In multivariate models, weight change and self-weighing frequency during the previous season, as well as days since randomization and intervention intensity were associated with seasonal weight changes. Conclusions: This study is the first to observe seasonal fluctuations of weight and self-weighing behavior among adults actively engaged in a weight loss intervention, consistent with research in the general population. Findings highlight the importance of acknowledging seasonal influence within weight loss programs and trials. Level of evidence: Level I, randomized controlled trial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Weight Reduction Programs
Random Allocation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Body Weight
Demography
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Seasonal fluctuations in weight and self-weighing behavior among adults in a behavioral weight loss intervention. / Fahey, Margaret C.; Klesges, Robert C.; Kocak, Mehmet; Talcott, Gerald W.; Krukowski, Rebecca.

In: Eating and Weight Disorders, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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