Second- and third-line treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with erlotinib in the community setting

Retrospective study of patient healthcare utilization and symptom burden

Edward J. Stepanski, Arthur C. Houts, Lee Schwartzberg, Mark S. Walker, Carolina M. Reyes, Johnetta Blakely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe treatment use patterns and outcomes with single-agent erlotinib among patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the community oncology setting. Patients and Methods: Retrospective chart review identified patients treated with single-agent erlotinib as either second-or third-line therapy from 4 community oncology clinics. Medical records were extracted for medical outcomes and resource utilization. Patients reported outcome measures of symptom burden and functioning. Results: A total of 45 patients with stage IIIB/IV disease in second- (n = 27) or third-line (n = 18) therapy were 44% female and 84% white (16% black), with mean age of 66.7 years (SD, 9.2). Over 93% of the patients had previous platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were treated with erlotinib for an average of 24 weeks. Dose reductions (24%) and treatment delays (29%) were due to skin reactions, diarrhea, and fatigue. The most common reasons for stopping erlotinib therapy were disease progression (53%), death (22%), and toxicities (11%). Patients' physical functioning improved during the first 3 months of erlotinib therapy. Hospitalizations (22%) were not due to erlotinib complications, and unplanned medical visits to the clinics were rare. Conclusion: Data from this community sample were generally in agreement with the major clinical trial of erlotinib. Erlotinib is well tolerated by second- and third-line patients with advanced NSCLC in the community setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-432
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Lung Cancer
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Retrospective Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics
Erlotinib Hydrochloride
Ambulatory Care
Platinum
Medical Records
Fatigue
Disease Progression
Diarrhea
Hospitalization
Clinical Trials
Drug Therapy
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Second- and third-line treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with erlotinib in the community setting : Retrospective study of patient healthcare utilization and symptom burden. / Stepanski, Edward J.; Houts, Arthur C.; Schwartzberg, Lee; Walker, Mark S.; Reyes, Carolina M.; Blakely, Johnetta.

In: Clinical Lung Cancer, Vol. 10, No. 6, 01.01.2009, p. 426-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe treatment use patterns and outcomes with single-agent erlotinib among patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the community oncology setting. Patients and Methods: Retrospective chart review identified patients treated with single-agent erlotinib as either second-or third-line therapy from 4 community oncology clinics. Medical records were extracted for medical outcomes and resource utilization. Patients reported outcome measures of symptom burden and functioning. Results: A total of 45 patients with stage IIIB/IV disease in second- (n = 27) or third-line (n = 18) therapy were 44{\%} female and 84{\%} white (16{\%} black), with mean age of 66.7 years (SD, 9.2). Over 93{\%} of the patients had previous platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were treated with erlotinib for an average of 24 weeks. Dose reductions (24{\%}) and treatment delays (29{\%}) were due to skin reactions, diarrhea, and fatigue. The most common reasons for stopping erlotinib therapy were disease progression (53{\%}), death (22{\%}), and toxicities (11{\%}). Patients' physical functioning improved during the first 3 months of erlotinib therapy. Hospitalizations (22{\%}) were not due to erlotinib complications, and unplanned medical visits to the clinics were rare. Conclusion: Data from this community sample were generally in agreement with the major clinical trial of erlotinib. Erlotinib is well tolerated by second- and third-line patients with advanced NSCLC in the community setting.",
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