Sedation for upper endoscopy: Comparison of midazolam versus fentanyl plus midazolam

Jose Barriga, Mankanwal S. Sachdev, Lee Royall, Garrick Brown, Claudio Tombazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The benefit of using one or two drugs for conscious sedation in upper endoscopy remains unproven. This study evaluates the adequacy of conscious sedation during upper endoscopy using midazolam alone compared with midazolam plus fentanyl. METHODS: Patients older than 18 years of age who underwent elective, outpatient upper endoscopy were included. They were randomized to receive either a combination of midazolam/fentanyl or midazolam alone. The adequacy of sedation obtained was assessed using a questionnaire answered by the physician at the end of the procedure, and by the patient 24 to 72 hours after endoscopy. RESULTS: From the endoscopist's perspective, following an intention-to-treat analysis, patients had better tolerance in the combination group (78.3% excellent/good tolerance M/F group versus 55.8% M group) (P = 0.043) (). Per patient's assessment excellent/good tolerance was found in 93% of M group and 94% in F/M group (P = 1.0). No difference in duration of the procedure was found between the two groups. No complications during endoscopies were reported.(Table is included in full-text article.) CONCLUSIONS: In diagnostic upper endoscopy, an adequate level of sedation can be obtained safely either by midazolam or midazolam plus fentanyl. From an endoscopist's perspective, the combination is significantly better.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-366
Number of pages5
JournalSouthern medical journal
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

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Midazolam
Fentanyl
Endoscopy
Conscious Sedation
Intention to Treat Analysis
Outpatients
Physicians
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sedation for upper endoscopy : Comparison of midazolam versus fentanyl plus midazolam. / Barriga, Jose; Sachdev, Mankanwal S.; Royall, Lee; Brown, Garrick; Tombazzi, Claudio.

In: Southern medical journal, Vol. 101, No. 4, 01.04.2008, p. 362-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barriga, Jose ; Sachdev, Mankanwal S. ; Royall, Lee ; Brown, Garrick ; Tombazzi, Claudio. / Sedation for upper endoscopy : Comparison of midazolam versus fentanyl plus midazolam. In: Southern medical journal. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 4. pp. 362-366.
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