Selective genotyping and phenotyping strategies in a complex trait context

Saunak Sen, Frank Johannes, Karl W. Broman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selective genotyping and phenotyping strategies are used to lower the cost of quantitative trait locus studies. Their efficiency has been studied primarily in simplified contexts - when a single locus contributes to the phenotype, and when the residual error (phenotype conditional on the genotype) is normally distributed. It is unclear how these strategies will perform in the context of complex traits where multiple loci, possibly linked or epistatic, may contribute to the trait. We also do not know what genotyping strategies should be used for nonnormally distributed phenotypes. For time-to-event phenotypes there is the additional question of choosing follow-up time duration. We use an information perspective to examine these experimental design issues in the broader context of complex traits and make recommendations on their use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1613-1626
Number of pages14
JournalGenetics
Volume181
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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Phenotype
Quantitative Trait Loci
Research Design
Genotype
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics

Cite this

Selective genotyping and phenotyping strategies in a complex trait context. / Sen, Saunak; Johannes, Frank; Broman, Karl W.

In: Genetics, Vol. 181, No. 4, 01.04.2009, p. 1613-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sen, Saunak ; Johannes, Frank ; Broman, Karl W. / Selective genotyping and phenotyping strategies in a complex trait context. In: Genetics. 2009 ; Vol. 181, No. 4. pp. 1613-1626.
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