Self-Efficacy, Physical Activity, and Aerobic Fitness in Middle School Children

Examination of a Pedometer Intervention Program

Dana Manley, Patricia Cowan, Joyce Graff, Michael Perlow, Pamela Rice, Phyllis Richey, Zoila Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical activity in children has been associated with a number of health benefits. Unfortunately, physical inactivity continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among self-efficacy levels, physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body composition (relative body mass index [RBMI]) and to determine whether a school-based pedometer intervention program would improve those variables. The sample consisted of 116 rural 11- to 13-year-old students. Weakly positive correlations between self-efficacy, physical activity, and aerobic fitness and weakly correlated inverse relationships between self-efficacy, physical activity, aerobic fitness and RBMI were found. There was no statistical significance between the intervention and control group when analyzing outcome variables. These findings suggest that those with optimal RBMI levels have higher self-efficacy, physical activity and aerobic fitness levels. Although not statistically significant, the intervention group had greater improvements in mean self-efficacy scores, aerobic fitness levels, and RBMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-237
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Self Efficacy
Exercise
Body Mass Index
Insurance Benefits
Body Composition
Students
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Self-Efficacy, Physical Activity, and Aerobic Fitness in Middle School Children : Examination of a Pedometer Intervention Program. / Manley, Dana; Cowan, Patricia; Graff, Joyce; Perlow, Michael; Rice, Pamela; Richey, Phyllis; Sanchez, Zoila.

In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 228-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manley, Dana ; Cowan, Patricia ; Graff, Joyce ; Perlow, Michael ; Rice, Pamela ; Richey, Phyllis ; Sanchez, Zoila. / Self-Efficacy, Physical Activity, and Aerobic Fitness in Middle School Children : Examination of a Pedometer Intervention Program. In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 228-237.
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