Self-management, amitriptyline, and amitripyline plus triamcinolone in the management of vulvodynia

Candace Brown, Jim Wan, Gloria Bachmann, Ray Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To conduct a prospective study to determine the efficacy of self-management interventions, amitriptyline, and amitriptyline plus topical triamcinolone in reducing vulvar pain in women with vulvodynia. Methods: This was a randomized, prospective study of 53 women between the ages of 18 and 72 with vulvodynia. Participants undertook one of three treatment interventions for a period of 12 weeks: self-management, oral amitriptyline (10-20 mg/day), or topical triamcinolone plus oral amitriptyline (10-20 mg/day). The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) was used to measure changes in qualitative pain using the pain rating index (PRI) and in quantitative pain using the present pain intensity (PPI) scale. Results: Of the 53 randomized subjects, 43 completed the trial. There were no statistically significant differences in PRI or PPI scores among the three treatment groups. Significant within-group differences were observed in the self-management group on the PRI and in the amitriptyline group on the PPI. Conclusions: This first randomized, prospective trial suggests that self-management has a modest effect and that low-dose amitriptyline (with and without topical triamcinolone) is not effective in reducing pain in women with vulvodynia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-169
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

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Vulvodynia
Triamcinolone
Amitriptyline
Self Care
Pain
Prospective Studies
Pain Measurement

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Self-management, amitriptyline, and amitripyline plus triamcinolone in the management of vulvodynia. / Brown, Candace; Wan, Jim; Bachmann, Gloria; Rosen, Ray.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 163-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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