Self-rated health among women with coronary disease

Depression is as important as recent cardiovascular events

Bernice Ruo, Daniel Bertenthal, Saunak Sen, Vera Bittner, Christine C. Ireland, Mark A. Hlatky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prior studies have shown an association between depression and self-rated health among patients with coronary disease. However, the magnitude of the effect of depression on self-rated health compared with that of major clinical events is unknown. Our main objective was to clarify the association between depression and self-rated health using longitudinal data. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study of 2675 postmenopausal women with coronary disease. The primary predictor variable was a 4-state categorical depression variable based on the Burnam depression screen assessed at sequential visits. The outcome variable was self-rated overall health (excellent, very good, or good vs fair or poor). Results: After adjustment for age, comorbidities, prior self-rated health, and interim events, women with depression at both current and prior annual visits had a >5-fold increased odds of fair/poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR] 5.1, 95% CI 3.8-6.8). New depression was associated with a >2-fold increased odds of fair/poor self-rated health (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0-3.4). Having a history of depression at the preceding annual visit but not at the current visit was associated with a slight increased odds of fair/poor self-rated health (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7). The magnitude of the impact of persistent or new depression was comparable to that of recent angina, myocardial infarction, angioplasty, heart failure, or bypass surgery. Conclusions: Women with persistent or new depression are more likely to report fair/poor self-rated health. The magnitude of the impact of persistent or new depression is comparable to that of major cardiac events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)921.e1-921.e7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume152
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Women's Health
Coronary Disease
Health
Odds Ratio
Angioplasty
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Heart Failure
Myocardial Infarction
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Self-rated health among women with coronary disease : Depression is as important as recent cardiovascular events. / Ruo, Bernice; Bertenthal, Daniel; Sen, Saunak; Bittner, Vera; Ireland, Christine C.; Hlatky, Mark A.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 152, No. 5, 01.01.2006, p. 921.e1-921.e7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruo, Bernice ; Bertenthal, Daniel ; Sen, Saunak ; Bittner, Vera ; Ireland, Christine C. ; Hlatky, Mark A. / Self-rated health among women with coronary disease : Depression is as important as recent cardiovascular events. In: American Heart Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 152, No. 5. pp. 921.e1-921.e7.
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