Self-reported efficacy of an ear-level prosthetic device that delivers altered auditory feedback for the management of stuttering

Joseph Kalinowski, Vijaya K. Guntupalli, Andrew Stuart, Tim Saltuklaroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous past efficacy studies in stuttering treatment have typically failed to assess generalization of therapeutic gains across speaking environments over time. The purpose of this study was to use a self-report format to gain insight into the improvements of clients who purchased an all in-the-ear device that provides altered auditory feedback to manage stuttering symptoms across everyday speaking situations. A total of 105 participants (age 7-81 years) returned completed questionnaires that examined seven parameters of stuttering behavior before acquiring the prosthetic device and after using the device with minimal clinical intervention for an average of 6 months. Across each parameter, participants rated a significant (P<0.001) improvement of approximately two units on seven-point scales after beginning to use the prosthetic device. In addition, the device received high overall satisfaction ratings, with a median score of 2.0 on the seven-point scale. Self-report is a 'must' for examining clinical efficacy in a disorder such as stuttering, which is so amenable to 'clinic room fluency' yet highly resistant to long-term amelioration. The data suggest that this device is helping to provide its users with functional, effective and efficient management of stuttering without the need for extended clinical follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-170
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Stuttering
Ear
Equipment and Supplies
Self Report

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Self-reported efficacy of an ear-level prosthetic device that delivers altered auditory feedback for the management of stuttering. / Kalinowski, Joseph; Guntupalli, Vijaya K.; Stuart, Andrew; Saltuklaroglu, Tim.

In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.06.2004, p. 167-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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