Self-Reported Physical Activity Among Blacks. Estimates from National Surveys

Melicia C. Whitt-Glover, Wendell C. Taylor, Gregory Heath, Caroline A. Macera

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: National surveillance data provide population-level estimates of physical activity participation, but generally do not include detailed subgroup analyses, which could provide a better understanding of physical activity among subgroups. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of self-reported regular physical activity among black adults using data from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n=19,189), the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (n=4263), and the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=3407). Methods: Analyses were conducted between January and March 2006. Datasets were analyzed separately to estimate the proportion of black adults meeting national physical activity recommendations overall and stratified by gender and other demographic subgroups. Results: The proportion of black adults reporting regular PA ranged from 24% to 36%. Regular physical activity was highest among men; younger age groups; highest education and income groups; those who were employed and married; overweight, but not obese, men; and normal-weight women. This pattern was consistent across surveys. Conclusions: The observed physical activity patterns were consistent with national trends. The data suggest that older black adults and those with low education and income levels are at greatest risk for inactive lifestyles and may require additional attention in efforts to increase physical activity in black adults. The variability across datasets reinforces the need for objective measures in national surveys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-417
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Education
Nutrition Surveys
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health Surveys
Life Style
Age Groups
Demography
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Population
Datasets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Self-Reported Physical Activity Among Blacks. Estimates from National Surveys. / Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Taylor, Wendell C.; Heath, Gregory; Macera, Caroline A.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.11.2007, p. 412-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Whitt-Glover, Melicia C. ; Taylor, Wendell C. ; Heath, Gregory ; Macera, Caroline A. / Self-Reported Physical Activity Among Blacks. Estimates from National Surveys. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 412-417.
@article{68d31e65b4744f61a2740bc287ff440f,
title = "Self-Reported Physical Activity Among Blacks. Estimates from National Surveys",
abstract = "Background: National surveillance data provide population-level estimates of physical activity participation, but generally do not include detailed subgroup analyses, which could provide a better understanding of physical activity among subgroups. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of self-reported regular physical activity among black adults using data from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n=19,189), the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (n=4263), and the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=3407). Methods: Analyses were conducted between January and March 2006. Datasets were analyzed separately to estimate the proportion of black adults meeting national physical activity recommendations overall and stratified by gender and other demographic subgroups. Results: The proportion of black adults reporting regular PA ranged from 24{\%} to 36{\%}. Regular physical activity was highest among men; younger age groups; highest education and income groups; those who were employed and married; overweight, but not obese, men; and normal-weight women. This pattern was consistent across surveys. Conclusions: The observed physical activity patterns were consistent with national trends. The data suggest that older black adults and those with low education and income levels are at greatest risk for inactive lifestyles and may require additional attention in efforts to increase physical activity in black adults. The variability across datasets reinforces the need for objective measures in national surveys.",
author = "Whitt-Glover, {Melicia C.} and Taylor, {Wendell C.} and Gregory Heath and Macera, {Caroline A.}",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2007.07.024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "412--417",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-Reported Physical Activity Among Blacks. Estimates from National Surveys

AU - Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.

AU - Taylor, Wendell C.

AU - Heath, Gregory

AU - Macera, Caroline A.

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - Background: National surveillance data provide population-level estimates of physical activity participation, but generally do not include detailed subgroup analyses, which could provide a better understanding of physical activity among subgroups. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of self-reported regular physical activity among black adults using data from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n=19,189), the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (n=4263), and the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=3407). Methods: Analyses were conducted between January and March 2006. Datasets were analyzed separately to estimate the proportion of black adults meeting national physical activity recommendations overall and stratified by gender and other demographic subgroups. Results: The proportion of black adults reporting regular PA ranged from 24% to 36%. Regular physical activity was highest among men; younger age groups; highest education and income groups; those who were employed and married; overweight, but not obese, men; and normal-weight women. This pattern was consistent across surveys. Conclusions: The observed physical activity patterns were consistent with national trends. The data suggest that older black adults and those with low education and income levels are at greatest risk for inactive lifestyles and may require additional attention in efforts to increase physical activity in black adults. The variability across datasets reinforces the need for objective measures in national surveys.

AB - Background: National surveillance data provide population-level estimates of physical activity participation, but generally do not include detailed subgroup analyses, which could provide a better understanding of physical activity among subgroups. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of self-reported regular physical activity among black adults using data from the 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n=19,189), the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (n=4263), and the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=3407). Methods: Analyses were conducted between January and March 2006. Datasets were analyzed separately to estimate the proportion of black adults meeting national physical activity recommendations overall and stratified by gender and other demographic subgroups. Results: The proportion of black adults reporting regular PA ranged from 24% to 36%. Regular physical activity was highest among men; younger age groups; highest education and income groups; those who were employed and married; overweight, but not obese, men; and normal-weight women. This pattern was consistent across surveys. Conclusions: The observed physical activity patterns were consistent with national trends. The data suggest that older black adults and those with low education and income levels are at greatest risk for inactive lifestyles and may require additional attention in efforts to increase physical activity in black adults. The variability across datasets reinforces the need for objective measures in national surveys.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35348928870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35348928870&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2007.07.024

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2007.07.024

M3 - Review article

VL - 33

SP - 412

EP - 417

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 5

ER -