Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students

Delia Smith West, Zoran Bursac, Donna Quimby, T. Elaine Prewitt, Thea Spatz, Creshelle Nash, Glen Mays, Kenya Eddings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize sugar-sweetened beverage intake of college students. Research Methods and Procedures: Undergraduates in an urban southern community campus were surveyed anonymously about sugared beverage consumption (soda, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet ice tea) in the past month. Results: Two hundred sixty-five undergraduates responded (66% women, 46% minority, 100% of volunteers solicited). Most students (95%) reported sugared beverage intake in the past month, and 65% reported daily intake. Men were more likely than women to report daily intake (74% vs. 61%, p = 0.035). Soda was the most common sugar-sweetened beverage. Black undergraduates reported higher sugared beverage intake than whites (p = 0.02), with 91% of blacks reporting sugar-sweetened fruit drink intake in the past month and 50% reporting daily consumption. Mean estimated caloric intake from combined types of sugar-sweetened beverages was significantly higher among black students than whites, 796 ± 941 vs. 397 ± 396 kcal/d (p = 0.0003); the primary source of sugar-sweetened beverage calories among blacks was sugared fruit drinks (556 ± 918 kcal/d). Younger undergraduates reported significantly higher intake than older students (p = 0.025). Discussion: Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among undergraduates is substantial and likely contributes considerable non-nutritive calories, which may contribute to weight gain. Black undergraduates may be particularly vulnerable due to higher sugared beverage intake. Obesity prevention interventions targeting reductions in sugar-sweetened beverages in this population merit consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1825-1831
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Beverages
Students
Fruit
Energy Drinks
Ice
Tea
Energy Intake
Weight Gain
Sports
Volunteers
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

West, D. S., Bursac, Z., Quimby, D., Prewitt, T. E., Spatz, T., Nash, C., ... Eddings, K. (2006). Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. Obesity, 14(10), 1825-1831. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.210

Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. / West, Delia Smith; Bursac, Zoran; Quimby, Donna; Prewitt, T. Elaine; Spatz, Thea; Nash, Creshelle; Mays, Glen; Eddings, Kenya.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 1825-1831.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, DS, Bursac, Z, Quimby, D, Prewitt, TE, Spatz, T, Nash, C, Mays, G & Eddings, K 2006, 'Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students', Obesity, vol. 14, no. 10, pp. 1825-1831. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.210
West DS, Bursac Z, Quimby D, Prewitt TE, Spatz T, Nash C et al. Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. Obesity. 2006 Oct 1;14(10):1825-1831. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.210
West, Delia Smith ; Bursac, Zoran ; Quimby, Donna ; Prewitt, T. Elaine ; Spatz, Thea ; Nash, Creshelle ; Mays, Glen ; Eddings, Kenya. / Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 10. pp. 1825-1831.
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