Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence

Teresa Zelante, Rossana G. Iannitti, Antonella De Luca, Javier Arroyo, Noelia Blanco, Giuseppe Servillo, Dominique Sanglard, Utz Reichard, Glen Palmer, Jean Paul Latgè, Paolo Puccetti, Luigina Romani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infections by opportunistic fungi have traditionally been viewed as the gross result of a pathogenic automatism, which makes a weakened host more vulnerable to microbial insults. However, fungal sensing of a host's immune environment might render this process more elaborate than previously appreciated. Here we show that interleukin (IL)-17A binds fungal cells, thus tackling both sides of the host-pathogen interaction in experimental settings of host colonization and/or chronic infection. Global transcriptional profiling reveals that IL-17A induces artificial nutrient starvation conditions in Candida albicans, resulting in a downregulation of the target of rapamycin signalling pathway and in an increase in autophagic responses and intracellular cAMP. The augmented adhesion and filamentous growth, also observed with Aspergillus fumigatus, eventually translates into enhanced biofilm formation and resistance to local antifungal defenses. This might exemplify a mechanism whereby fungi have evolved a means of sensing host immunity to ensure their own persistence in an immunologically dynamic environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number683
JournalNature Communications
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 7 2012

Fingerprint

virulence
interleukins
Interleukin-17
fungi
infectious diseases
Fungi
Virulence
Automatism
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Aspergillus
biofilms
Aspergillus fumigatus
pathogens
Mycoses
Candida
Opportunistic Infections
nutrients
immunity
Biofilms
Pathogens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Zelante, T., Iannitti, R. G., De Luca, A., Arroyo, J., Blanco, N., Servillo, G., ... Romani, L. (2012). Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence. Nature Communications, 3, [683]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1685

Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence. / Zelante, Teresa; Iannitti, Rossana G.; De Luca, Antonella; Arroyo, Javier; Blanco, Noelia; Servillo, Giuseppe; Sanglard, Dominique; Reichard, Utz; Palmer, Glen; Latgè, Jean Paul; Puccetti, Paolo; Romani, Luigina.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 3, 683, 07.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zelante, T, Iannitti, RG, De Luca, A, Arroyo, J, Blanco, N, Servillo, G, Sanglard, D, Reichard, U, Palmer, G, Latgè, JP, Puccetti, P & Romani, L 2012, 'Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence', Nature Communications, vol. 3, 683. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1685
Zelante T, Iannitti RG, De Luca A, Arroyo J, Blanco N, Servillo G et al. Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence. Nature Communications. 2012 Mar 7;3. 683. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1685
Zelante, Teresa ; Iannitti, Rossana G. ; De Luca, Antonella ; Arroyo, Javier ; Blanco, Noelia ; Servillo, Giuseppe ; Sanglard, Dominique ; Reichard, Utz ; Palmer, Glen ; Latgè, Jean Paul ; Puccetti, Paolo ; Romani, Luigina. / Sensing of mammalian IL-17A regulates fungal adaptation and virulence. In: Nature Communications. 2012 ; Vol. 3.
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