Sensitization of cervical cancer cell lines to low-dose radiation by retinoic acid does not require functional p53

Todd Tillmanns, Scott A. Kamelle, Suresh Guruswamy, Natalie S. Gould, Teresa L. Rutledge, Doris M. Benbrook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective. Current therapy for cervical cancer includes radiation therapy. Retinoic acid (RA) can increase the sensitivity of cervical cancer cell lines to radiation. The mechanism of this sensitization may not involve the p53 protein because the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein, which is present in the majority of cervical cancers, promotes p53 degradation. The objective of this study was to determine if p53 is involved in the mechanism of RA radiosensitization. Methods. The effects of radiation on cervical (SiHa, CC-1, and C33a) and vulvar (SW962) cancer cell lines under various experimental conditions were evaluated using clonogenic, Coulter Counter, electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and a multi-probe RNase protection assay of p53-inducible genes. Results. RA (5 μM 9-cis-RA) radiosensitized the SiHa and CC-1 cell lines that contain HPV-degraded p53, but did not radiosensitize the SW962 cell line, which is HPV negative and contains wild-type p53, nor the C33a cell line, which contains mutant p53 (R273C). Expression of mutant p53 (R273H) in SiHa cells increased the growth rate, but did not prevent RA-induced differentiation or radiosensitization at clinically relevant doses. Inhibition of p53 transactivation with pifithirin α did not prevent RA radiosensitization of SiHa at 5 Gy. RA repressed c-fos mRNA expression in control and irradiated SiHa cultures, but did not repress bcl-xL, p53, GADD45, p21, bax, bcl-2, or mcl-1 mRNA expression. Conclusions. The mechanism of RA radiosensitization does not require functional p53 and may involve c-fos in cervical cancer cell lines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-150
Number of pages9
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Tretinoin
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Radiation
Cell Line
Vulvar Neoplasms
Messenger RNA
p53 Genes
Radiation Effects
Ribonucleases
Transcriptional Activation
Proteins
Radiotherapy
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Sensitization of cervical cancer cell lines to low-dose radiation by retinoic acid does not require functional p53. / Tillmanns, Todd; Kamelle, Scott A.; Guruswamy, Suresh; Gould, Natalie S.; Rutledge, Teresa L.; Benbrook, Doris M.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 142-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tillmanns, Todd ; Kamelle, Scott A. ; Guruswamy, Suresh ; Gould, Natalie S. ; Rutledge, Teresa L. ; Benbrook, Doris M. / Sensitization of cervical cancer cell lines to low-dose radiation by retinoic acid does not require functional p53. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 142-150.
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abstract = "Objective. Current therapy for cervical cancer includes radiation therapy. Retinoic acid (RA) can increase the sensitivity of cervical cancer cell lines to radiation. The mechanism of this sensitization may not involve the p53 protein because the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein, which is present in the majority of cervical cancers, promotes p53 degradation. The objective of this study was to determine if p53 is involved in the mechanism of RA radiosensitization. Methods. The effects of radiation on cervical (SiHa, CC-1, and C33a) and vulvar (SW962) cancer cell lines under various experimental conditions were evaluated using clonogenic, Coulter Counter, electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and a multi-probe RNase protection assay of p53-inducible genes. Results. RA (5 μM 9-cis-RA) radiosensitized the SiHa and CC-1 cell lines that contain HPV-degraded p53, but did not radiosensitize the SW962 cell line, which is HPV negative and contains wild-type p53, nor the C33a cell line, which contains mutant p53 (R273C). Expression of mutant p53 (R273H) in SiHa cells increased the growth rate, but did not prevent RA-induced differentiation or radiosensitization at clinically relevant doses. Inhibition of p53 transactivation with pifithirin α did not prevent RA radiosensitization of SiHa at 5 Gy. RA repressed c-fos mRNA expression in control and irradiated SiHa cultures, but did not repress bcl-xL, p53, GADD45, p21, bax, bcl-2, or mcl-1 mRNA expression. Conclusions. The mechanism of RA radiosensitization does not require functional p53 and may involve c-fos in cervical cancer cell lines.",
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AB - Objective. Current therapy for cervical cancer includes radiation therapy. Retinoic acid (RA) can increase the sensitivity of cervical cancer cell lines to radiation. The mechanism of this sensitization may not involve the p53 protein because the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein, which is present in the majority of cervical cancers, promotes p53 degradation. The objective of this study was to determine if p53 is involved in the mechanism of RA radiosensitization. Methods. The effects of radiation on cervical (SiHa, CC-1, and C33a) and vulvar (SW962) cancer cell lines under various experimental conditions were evaluated using clonogenic, Coulter Counter, electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and a multi-probe RNase protection assay of p53-inducible genes. Results. RA (5 μM 9-cis-RA) radiosensitized the SiHa and CC-1 cell lines that contain HPV-degraded p53, but did not radiosensitize the SW962 cell line, which is HPV negative and contains wild-type p53, nor the C33a cell line, which contains mutant p53 (R273C). Expression of mutant p53 (R273H) in SiHa cells increased the growth rate, but did not prevent RA-induced differentiation or radiosensitization at clinically relevant doses. Inhibition of p53 transactivation with pifithirin α did not prevent RA radiosensitization of SiHa at 5 Gy. RA repressed c-fos mRNA expression in control and irradiated SiHa cultures, but did not repress bcl-xL, p53, GADD45, p21, bax, bcl-2, or mcl-1 mRNA expression. Conclusions. The mechanism of RA radiosensitization does not require functional p53 and may involve c-fos in cervical cancer cell lines.

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