Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth

Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II)

Anna B. Fishbein, Todd A. Lee, Miao Cai, Sam S. Oh, Celeste Eng, Donglei Hu, Scott Huntsman, Harold J. Farber, Denise Serebrisky, Jonathan Silverberg, L. Keoki Williams, Max A. Seibold, Saunak Sen, Luisa N. Borrell, Pedro Avila, William Rodriguez-Cintron, Jose R. Rodriguez-Santana, Esteban G. Burchard, Rajesh Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background Pest allergen sensitization is associated with asthma morbidity in urban youth but minimally explored in Latino populations. Specifically, the effect of mouse sensitization on the risk of asthma exacerbation has been unexplored in Latino subgroups. Objective To evaluate whether pest allergen sensitization is a predictor of asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control in urban minority children with asthma. Methods Latino and African American children (8–21 years old) with asthma were recruited from 4 sites across the United States. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of mouse or cockroach sensitization with asthma-related acute care visits or hospitalizations. Results A total of 1,992 children with asthma in the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II) cohorts were studied. Asthmatic children from New York had the highest rate of pest allergen sensitization (42% mouse, 56% cockroach), with the lowest rate in San Francisco (4% mouse, 8% cockroach). Mouse sensitization, more than cockroach, was associated with increased odds of acute care visits (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07–2.03) or hospitalizations (aOR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.81–5.18), even after controlling for self-reported race and site of recruitment. In stratified analyses, Mexican youth sensitized to mouse allergen did not have higher odds of asthma exacerbation. Other Latino and Puerto Rican youth sensitized to mouse had higher odds of hospitalization for asthma (aORs, 4.57 [95% CI, 1.86–11.22] and 10.01 [95% CI, 1.77–56.6], respectively) but not emergency department visits. Conclusion Pest allergen sensitization is associated with a higher odds of asthma exacerbations in urban minority youth. Puerto Rican and Other Latino youth sensitized to mouse were more likely to have asthma-related hospitalizations than Mexican youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-49.e1
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Cockroaches
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Allergens
Asthma
Morbidity
Genes
Hospitalization
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
San Francisco
Hospital Emergency Service

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth : Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II). / Fishbein, Anna B.; Lee, Todd A.; Cai, Miao; Oh, Sam S.; Eng, Celeste; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Farber, Harold J.; Serebrisky, Denise; Silverberg, Jonathan; Williams, L. Keoki; Seibold, Max A.; Sen, Saunak; Borrell, Luisa N.; Avila, Pedro; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Kumar, Rajesh.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 117, No. 1, 01.07.2016, p. 43-49.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fishbein, AB, Lee, TA, Cai, M, Oh, SS, Eng, C, Hu, D, Huntsman, S, Farber, HJ, Serebrisky, D, Silverberg, J, Williams, LK, Seibold, MA, Sen, S, Borrell, LN, Avila, P, Rodriguez-Cintron, W, Rodriguez-Santana, JR, Burchard, EG & Kumar, R 2016, 'Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth: Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II)', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 43-49.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2016.05.004
Fishbein, Anna B. ; Lee, Todd A. ; Cai, Miao ; Oh, Sam S. ; Eng, Celeste ; Hu, Donglei ; Huntsman, Scott ; Farber, Harold J. ; Serebrisky, Denise ; Silverberg, Jonathan ; Williams, L. Keoki ; Seibold, Max A. ; Sen, Saunak ; Borrell, Luisa N. ; Avila, Pedro ; Rodriguez-Cintron, William ; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R. ; Burchard, Esteban G. ; Kumar, Rajesh. / Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth : Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II). In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2016 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 43-49.e1.
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abstract = "Background Pest allergen sensitization is associated with asthma morbidity in urban youth but minimally explored in Latino populations. Specifically, the effect of mouse sensitization on the risk of asthma exacerbation has been unexplored in Latino subgroups. Objective To evaluate whether pest allergen sensitization is a predictor of asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control in urban minority children with asthma. Methods Latino and African American children (8–21 years old) with asthma were recruited from 4 sites across the United States. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of mouse or cockroach sensitization with asthma-related acute care visits or hospitalizations. Results A total of 1,992 children with asthma in the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II) cohorts were studied. Asthmatic children from New York had the highest rate of pest allergen sensitization (42{\%} mouse, 56{\%} cockroach), with the lowest rate in San Francisco (4{\%} mouse, 8{\%} cockroach). Mouse sensitization, more than cockroach, was associated with increased odds of acute care visits (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.47; 95{\%} CI, 1.07–2.03) or hospitalizations (aOR, 3.07; 95{\%} CI, 1.81–5.18), even after controlling for self-reported race and site of recruitment. In stratified analyses, Mexican youth sensitized to mouse allergen did not have higher odds of asthma exacerbation. Other Latino and Puerto Rican youth sensitized to mouse had higher odds of hospitalization for asthma (aORs, 4.57 [95{\%} CI, 1.86–11.22] and 10.01 [95{\%} CI, 1.77–56.6], respectively) but not emergency department visits. Conclusion Pest allergen sensitization is associated with a higher odds of asthma exacerbations in urban minority youth. Puerto Rican and Other Latino youth sensitized to mouse were more likely to have asthma-related hospitalizations than Mexican youth.",
author = "Fishbein, {Anna B.} and Lee, {Todd A.} and Miao Cai and Oh, {Sam S.} and Celeste Eng and Donglei Hu and Scott Huntsman and Farber, {Harold J.} and Denise Serebrisky and Jonathan Silverberg and Williams, {L. Keoki} and Seibold, {Max A.} and Saunak Sen and Borrell, {Luisa N.} and Pedro Avila and William Rodriguez-Cintron and Rodriguez-Santana, {Jose R.} and Burchard, {Esteban G.} and Rajesh Kumar",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth

T2 - Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II)

AU - Fishbein, Anna B.

AU - Lee, Todd A.

AU - Cai, Miao

AU - Oh, Sam S.

AU - Eng, Celeste

AU - Hu, Donglei

AU - Huntsman, Scott

AU - Farber, Harold J.

AU - Serebrisky, Denise

AU - Silverberg, Jonathan

AU - Williams, L. Keoki

AU - Seibold, Max A.

AU - Sen, Saunak

AU - Borrell, Luisa N.

AU - Avila, Pedro

AU - Rodriguez-Cintron, William

AU - Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.

AU - Burchard, Esteban G.

AU - Kumar, Rajesh

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Background Pest allergen sensitization is associated with asthma morbidity in urban youth but minimally explored in Latino populations. Specifically, the effect of mouse sensitization on the risk of asthma exacerbation has been unexplored in Latino subgroups. Objective To evaluate whether pest allergen sensitization is a predictor of asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control in urban minority children with asthma. Methods Latino and African American children (8–21 years old) with asthma were recruited from 4 sites across the United States. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of mouse or cockroach sensitization with asthma-related acute care visits or hospitalizations. Results A total of 1,992 children with asthma in the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II) cohorts were studied. Asthmatic children from New York had the highest rate of pest allergen sensitization (42% mouse, 56% cockroach), with the lowest rate in San Francisco (4% mouse, 8% cockroach). Mouse sensitization, more than cockroach, was associated with increased odds of acute care visits (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07–2.03) or hospitalizations (aOR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.81–5.18), even after controlling for self-reported race and site of recruitment. In stratified analyses, Mexican youth sensitized to mouse allergen did not have higher odds of asthma exacerbation. Other Latino and Puerto Rican youth sensitized to mouse had higher odds of hospitalization for asthma (aORs, 4.57 [95% CI, 1.86–11.22] and 10.01 [95% CI, 1.77–56.6], respectively) but not emergency department visits. Conclusion Pest allergen sensitization is associated with a higher odds of asthma exacerbations in urban minority youth. Puerto Rican and Other Latino youth sensitized to mouse were more likely to have asthma-related hospitalizations than Mexican youth.

AB - Background Pest allergen sensitization is associated with asthma morbidity in urban youth but minimally explored in Latino populations. Specifically, the effect of mouse sensitization on the risk of asthma exacerbation has been unexplored in Latino subgroups. Objective To evaluate whether pest allergen sensitization is a predictor of asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control in urban minority children with asthma. Methods Latino and African American children (8–21 years old) with asthma were recruited from 4 sites across the United States. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of mouse or cockroach sensitization with asthma-related acute care visits or hospitalizations. Results A total of 1,992 children with asthma in the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II) cohorts were studied. Asthmatic children from New York had the highest rate of pest allergen sensitization (42% mouse, 56% cockroach), with the lowest rate in San Francisco (4% mouse, 8% cockroach). Mouse sensitization, more than cockroach, was associated with increased odds of acute care visits (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07–2.03) or hospitalizations (aOR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.81–5.18), even after controlling for self-reported race and site of recruitment. In stratified analyses, Mexican youth sensitized to mouse allergen did not have higher odds of asthma exacerbation. Other Latino and Puerto Rican youth sensitized to mouse had higher odds of hospitalization for asthma (aORs, 4.57 [95% CI, 1.86–11.22] and 10.01 [95% CI, 1.77–56.6], respectively) but not emergency department visits. Conclusion Pest allergen sensitization is associated with a higher odds of asthma exacerbations in urban minority youth. Puerto Rican and Other Latino youth sensitized to mouse were more likely to have asthma-related hospitalizations than Mexican youth.

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