Sensorimotor activity measured via oscillations of EEG mu rhythms in speech and non-speech discrimination tasks with and without segmentation demands

David Thornton, Ashley Harkrider, David Jenson, Tim Saltuklaroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Better understanding of the role of sensorimotor processing in speech and non-speech segmentation can be achieved with more temporally precise measures. Twenty adults made same/different discriminations of speech and non-speech stimuli pairs, with and without segmentation demands. Independent component analysis of 64-channel EEG data revealed clear sensorimotor mu components, with characteristic alpha and beta peaks, localized to premotor regions in 70% of participants. Time-frequency analyses of mu components from accurate trials showed that (1) segmentation tasks elicited greater event-related synchronization immediately following offset of the first stimulus, suggestive of inhibitory activity; (2) strong late event-related desynchronization in all conditions, suggesting that working memory/covert replay contributed substantially to sensorimotor activity in all conditions; (3) stronger beta desynchronization in speech versus non-speech stimuli during stimulus presentation, suggesting stronger auditory-motor transforms for speech versus non-speech stimuli. Findings support the continued use of oscillatory approaches for helping understand segmentation and other cognitive tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-73
Number of pages12
JournalBrain and Language
Volume187
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Electroencephalography
stimulus
discrimination
Speech Perception
Short-Term Memory
event
segmentation
Discrimination (Psychology)
Segmentation
Stimulus
Oscillation
Electroencephalogram
Rhythm
Discrimination
Sensorimotor

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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abstract = "Better understanding of the role of sensorimotor processing in speech and non-speech segmentation can be achieved with more temporally precise measures. Twenty adults made same/different discriminations of speech and non-speech stimuli pairs, with and without segmentation demands. Independent component analysis of 64-channel EEG data revealed clear sensorimotor mu components, with characteristic alpha and beta peaks, localized to premotor regions in 70{\%} of participants. Time-frequency analyses of mu components from accurate trials showed that (1) segmentation tasks elicited greater event-related synchronization immediately following offset of the first stimulus, suggestive of inhibitory activity; (2) strong late event-related desynchronization in all conditions, suggesting that working memory/covert replay contributed substantially to sensorimotor activity in all conditions; (3) stronger beta desynchronization in speech versus non-speech stimuli during stimulus presentation, suggesting stronger auditory-motor transforms for speech versus non-speech stimuli. Findings support the continued use of oscillatory approaches for helping understand segmentation and other cognitive tasks.",
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