Sensory nerve dysfunction and hallux valgus correction

A prospective study

James R. Jastifer, Michael J. Coughlin, Jesse Doty, Faustin R. Stevens, Christopher Hirose, Travis J. Kemp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sensory nerve dysfunction in patients with hallux valgus has been described as both a symptom of the deformity and a complication of the treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify nerve dysfunction in hallux valgus patients and to prospectively evaluate whether the trauma of surgery or the correction of the deformity had any effect on the sensory nerve function. Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive feet undergoing operative correction for hallux valgus were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative and 3-, 6-, and 24-month postoperative clinical, radiographic, and detailed sensory examinations were completed. For the sensory examination, a Semmes-Weinstein 5.07 monofilament was used to establish, if present, a geometric area of sensory deficit about the hallux. This area was traced onto calibrated graphing paper and processed with imaging software. A total of 48/57 (84%) went on to complete 24 months of follow-up. Results: Preoperative sensory area deficit improved by a mean of 529 mm2 at 24-month follow-up. The mean preoperative sensory deficit area was 688 mm2 (SD 681 mm2, range: 0 to 2885 mm2) and 24-month postoperative sensory deficit area was 159 mm2 (SD 329 mm2, range: 0 to 1463 mm2). No clinically significant correlation existed between deficit and clinical outcome measures. Conclusions: This study showed that preoperative sensory deficits exist, and can improve up to 24 months after operative correction of the hallux valgus deformity. This supports the concept that sensory deficit in hallux valgus is at least partially caused by a reversible injury to the sensory nerves, not necessarily a complication of surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-763
Number of pages7
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Hallux Valgus
Prospective Studies
Hallux
Wounds and Injuries
Foot
Software
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Jastifer, J. R., Coughlin, M. J., Doty, J., Stevens, F. R., Hirose, C., & Kemp, T. J. (2014). Sensory nerve dysfunction and hallux valgus correction: A prospective study. Foot and Ankle International, 35(8), 757-763. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071100714534216

Sensory nerve dysfunction and hallux valgus correction : A prospective study. / Jastifer, James R.; Coughlin, Michael J.; Doty, Jesse; Stevens, Faustin R.; Hirose, Christopher; Kemp, Travis J.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 757-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Jastifer, JR, Coughlin, MJ, Doty, J, Stevens, FR, Hirose, C & Kemp, TJ 2014, 'Sensory nerve dysfunction and hallux valgus correction: A prospective study', Foot and Ankle International, vol. 35, no. 8, pp. 757-763. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071100714534216
Jastifer, James R. ; Coughlin, Michael J. ; Doty, Jesse ; Stevens, Faustin R. ; Hirose, Christopher ; Kemp, Travis J. / Sensory nerve dysfunction and hallux valgus correction : A prospective study. In: Foot and Ankle International. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 8. pp. 757-763.
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