Sentinel node biopsy for orbital and ocular adnexal tumors

Matthew Wilson, James Fleming, R. M. Fleming, Barrett G. Haik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe a technique for sentinel node mapping and biopsy in patients with orbital or adnexal tumors. Methods: Five patients with orbital and adnexal tumors were studied. Two patients had malignant eyelid melanomas (one of the skin and one of the conjunctiva), one with orbital invasion. Two patients had sebaceous gland carcinoma, and one patient had a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the conjunctiva; 500 μCi of Technetium-99m sulfur nanocolloid (Nycomed Amersham, Princeton, NJ) diluted to 1.0 mL was injected intradermally at the lateral canthus. The patients were positioned as they would be during surgery. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed by means of anterior, lateral, and oblique views. The tracer was followed to the first lymphatic basin, and the sentinel node was identified. Cutaneous markers were placed to denote the site. During surgery, lymphoscintigraphy scans and a hand-held gamma probe were used to locate the sentinel node. Once excised, the sentinel node was sent for histopathology. Frozen sectioning confirmed the presence of lymphoid tissue. Permanent sections with immunohistochemical markers were performed to examine for metastatic disease. Results: The sentinel node biopsy technique was applied to 5 patients with orbital and adnexal tumors. All lymph nodes were free of tumor on histopathologic examination. Conclusions: Sentinel node mapping and biopsy are possible for orbital and adnexal tumors. The morbidity of elective lymph node dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy can be avoided. Our results are preliminary, and further work must be done to identify the lymphatic basins of the orbit and ocular adnexa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-344
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 17 2001

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Biopsy
Neoplasms
Lymphoscintigraphy
Conjunctiva
Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma
Sebaceous Glands
Lacrimal Apparatus
Skin
Adjuvant Radiotherapy
Technetium
Lymphoid Tissue
Orbit
Eyelids
cyhalothrin
Lymph Node Excision
Sulfur
Melanoma
Hand
Lymph Nodes
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Sentinel node biopsy for orbital and ocular adnexal tumors. / Wilson, Matthew; Fleming, James; Fleming, R. M.; Haik, Barrett G.

In: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 17, No. 5, 17.10.2001, p. 338-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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