Serious complications of vascular catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in cancer patients

I. Raad, John Narro, A. Khan, J. Tarrand, S. Vartivarian, G. P. Bodey

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Abstract

Over the period 1986 to 1989, 53 cancer patients were identified with catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Septic thrombosis was diagnosed in 12 (23 %) patients and was suspected in another 3 (6 %). Of the 12 patients, five developed deep-seated infections (septic emboli, endocarditis, meningitis, abscess), compared with 2 of the 38 other patients with no septic thrombosis (p<0.01). Fever persisted for more than three days after antibiotic initiation in 52 % of the patients with complications (septic thrombosis and/or deep-seated infections), compared with 19 % of those without complications (p<0.02). Of the three patients with complications who were treated for 14 days with intravenous antistaphylococcal antibiotics, two relapsed; in contrast, all of the nine patients with complications who were treated for more than 14 days (mean 4 weeks) were cured, and none relapsed (p<0.05). Of the nine patients with complications who were treated with a long course of therapy, only one required surgery. The possibility of septic thrombosis and/or deep-seated infections should be considered in all cancer patients with catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, and if present, the condition should be treated with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for at least four weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-682
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Access Devices
Bacteremia
Staphylococcus aureus
Neoplasms
Thrombosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Catheters
Infection
Endocarditis
Embolism
Meningitis
Abscess
Fever

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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Serious complications of vascular catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in cancer patients. / Raad, I.; Narro, John; Khan, A.; Tarrand, J.; Vartivarian, S.; Bodey, G. P.

In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 8, 01.08.1992, p. 675-682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Over the period 1986 to 1989, 53 cancer patients were identified with catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Septic thrombosis was diagnosed in 12 (23 {\%}) patients and was suspected in another 3 (6 {\%}). Of the 12 patients, five developed deep-seated infections (septic emboli, endocarditis, meningitis, abscess), compared with 2 of the 38 other patients with no septic thrombosis (p<0.01). Fever persisted for more than three days after antibiotic initiation in 52 {\%} of the patients with complications (septic thrombosis and/or deep-seated infections), compared with 19 {\%} of those without complications (p<0.02). Of the three patients with complications who were treated for 14 days with intravenous antistaphylococcal antibiotics, two relapsed; in contrast, all of the nine patients with complications who were treated for more than 14 days (mean 4 weeks) were cured, and none relapsed (p<0.05). Of the nine patients with complications who were treated with a long course of therapy, only one required surgery. The possibility of septic thrombosis and/or deep-seated infections should be considered in all cancer patients with catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, and if present, the condition should be treated with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for at least four weeks.",
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