Serum uric acid and ambulatory blood pressure in children with primary hypertension

Deborah P. Jones, Phyllis Richey, Bruce S. Alpert, Rongling Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperuricemia is associated with primary hypertension (HTN) in adults and children. Furthermore, uric acid levels during childhood are associated with blood pressure (BP) levels in adulthood. We measured 24-h ambulatory BP and serum uric acid (SUA) in 104 children referred for possible hypertension. Mean age was 13.7 ± 2.6 y (range, 7-18 y) with 67 males and 37 females; 74 were African-American, 29 Caucasian and one Asian. SUA was associated with age (r = 0.38, p = 0.0001) and BMI Z-score (r = 0.23, p = 0.021). SUA was significantly associated with mean ambulatory systolic (S) and diastolic (D) BP. Mean ambulatory BP was normalized to gender- and height-specific reference standards using BP index. SUA was significantly associated with 24-h DBP index and nocturnal DBP index after adjusting for age, gender, race, BMI Z-score and urinary sodium excretion. SUA was also significantly associated with 24-h DBP load and nocturnal DBP load. Uric acid was significantly associated with increased likelihood for diastolic HTN (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.2, 3.7; p = 0.0063) after adjusting for other co-variables. Among children at risk for HTN, the likelihood for diastolic HTN (as defined by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) increases significantly as SUA increases. SUA may be associated with increased severity of HTN during youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-561
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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Uric Acid
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Serum
Hyperuricemia
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
African Americans
Sodium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Serum uric acid and ambulatory blood pressure in children with primary hypertension. / Jones, Deborah P.; Richey, Phyllis; Alpert, Bruce S.; Li, Rongling.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 64, No. 5, 01.11.2008, p. 556-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, Deborah P. ; Richey, Phyllis ; Alpert, Bruce S. ; Li, Rongling. / Serum uric acid and ambulatory blood pressure in children with primary hypertension. In: Pediatric Research. 2008 ; Vol. 64, No. 5. pp. 556-561.
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