Sex-related differences in the prevalence of cognitive impairment among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes

Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity may increase risks for cognitive decline as individuals age. It is unknown whether this results in different prevalences of cognitive impairment for women and men. Methods: The Action for Health in Diabetes, a randomized controlled clinical trial of a 10-year intensive lifestyle intervention, adjudicated cases of cross-sectional cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment or dementia) 10–13 years after enrollment in 3802 individuals (61% women). Results: The cross-sectional prevalences of cognitive impairment were 8.3% (women) and 14.8% (men): adjusted odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval [0.43, 0.71], P <.001. Demographic, clinical, and lifestyle risk factors varied between women and men but did not account for this difference, which was limited to individuals without apolipoprotein E (APOE)-ε4 alleles (interaction P =.034). Conclusions: Among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, traditional risk factors did not account for the lower prevalence of cognitive impairment observed in women compared with men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1184-1192
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Life Style
Apolipoprotein E4
Cognitive Dysfunction
Dementia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Alleles
Odds Ratio
Demography
Confidence Intervals
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sex-related differences in the prevalence of cognitive impairment among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. / Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) Research Group.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Vol. 14, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 1184-1192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) Research Group. / Sex-related differences in the prevalence of cognitive impairment among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 9. pp. 1184-1192.
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