Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver

Daniel M. Gatti, Ni Zhao, Elissa J. Chesler, Blair U. Bradford, Andrey A. Shabalin, Roumyana Yordanova, Lu Lu, Ivan Rusyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Differences in clinical phenotypes between the sexes are well documented and have their roots in differential gene expression. While sex has a major effect on gene expression, transcription is also influenced by complex interactions between individual genetic variation and environmental stimuli. In this study, we sought to understand how genetic variation affects sex-related differences in liver gene expression by performing genetic mapping of genomewide liver mRNA expression data in a genetically defined population of naive male and female mice from C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, B6D2F1, and 37 C57BL/6J X DBA/2J (BXD) recombinant inbred strains. As expected, we found that many genes important to xenobiotic metabolism and other important pathways exhibit sexually dimorphic expression. We also performed gene expression quantitative trait locus mapping in this panel and report that the most significant loci that appear to regulate a larger number of genes than expected by chance are largely sex independent. Importantly, we found that the degree of correlation within gene expression networks differs substantially between the sexes. Finally, we compare our results to a recently released human liver gene expression data set and report on important similarities in sexually dimorphic liver gene expression between mouse and human. This study enhances our understanding of sex differences at the genome level and between species, as well as increasing our knowledge of the molecular underpinnings of sex differences in responses to xenobiotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-468
Number of pages13
JournalPhysiological genomics
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Gene Expression
Liver
Sex Characteristics
Xenobiotics
Gene Regulatory Networks
Quantitative Trait Loci
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Genes
Genome
Phenotype
Messenger RNA
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Gatti, D. M., Zhao, N., Chesler, E. J., Bradford, B. U., Shabalin, A. A., Yordanova, R., ... Rusyn, I. (2010). Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver. Physiological genomics, 42(3), 456-468. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00110.2009

Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver. / Gatti, Daniel M.; Zhao, Ni; Chesler, Elissa J.; Bradford, Blair U.; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Yordanova, Roumyana; Lu, Lu; Rusyn, Ivan.

In: Physiological genomics, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.08.2010, p. 456-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gatti, DM, Zhao, N, Chesler, EJ, Bradford, BU, Shabalin, AA, Yordanova, R, Lu, L & Rusyn, I 2010, 'Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver', Physiological genomics, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 456-468. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00110.2009
Gatti DM, Zhao N, Chesler EJ, Bradford BU, Shabalin AA, Yordanova R et al. Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver. Physiological genomics. 2010 Aug 1;42(3):456-468. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00110.2009
Gatti, Daniel M. ; Zhao, Ni ; Chesler, Elissa J. ; Bradford, Blair U. ; Shabalin, Andrey A. ; Yordanova, Roumyana ; Lu, Lu ; Rusyn, Ivan. / Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver. In: Physiological genomics. 2010 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 456-468.
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