Shock wave therapy (Orthotripsy®) in musculoskeletal disorders

John A. Ogden, Richard Alvarez, Richard Levitt, Marie Marlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which now is used routinely for urolithiasis, has gained increasing acceptance in Europe for some musculoskeletal problems and has led to the inception of clinical studies in the United States. The authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic effects of shock waves on human musculoskeletal tissues, the credibility of published studies on therapeutic applications, and the potential for more widespread application of this modality to various skeletal and near-skeletal disorders. The primary advantage of extracorporeal shock wave therapy is its noninvasive nature and seemingly minimal complications when applied to musculoskeletal tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-40
Number of pages19
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number387
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Convulsive Therapy
Urolithiasis
Therapeutics
Clinical Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Shock wave therapy (Orthotripsy®) in musculoskeletal disorders. / Ogden, John A.; Alvarez, Richard; Levitt, Richard; Marlow, Marie.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 387, 01.01.2001, p. 22-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogden, John A. ; Alvarez, Richard ; Levitt, Richard ; Marlow, Marie. / Shock wave therapy (Orthotripsy®) in musculoskeletal disorders. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2001 ; No. 387. pp. 22-40.
@article{d87d869a6f1d4358a38dd54096ac5d74,
title = "Shock wave therapy (Orthotripsy{\circledR}) in musculoskeletal disorders",
abstract = "Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which now is used routinely for urolithiasis, has gained increasing acceptance in Europe for some musculoskeletal problems and has led to the inception of clinical studies in the United States. The authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic effects of shock waves on human musculoskeletal tissues, the credibility of published studies on therapeutic applications, and the potential for more widespread application of this modality to various skeletal and near-skeletal disorders. The primary advantage of extracorporeal shock wave therapy is its noninvasive nature and seemingly minimal complications when applied to musculoskeletal tissues.",
author = "Ogden, {John A.} and Richard Alvarez and Richard Levitt and Marie Marlow",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00003086-200106000-00005",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "22--40",
journal = "Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research",
issn = "0009-921X",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "387",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shock wave therapy (Orthotripsy®) in musculoskeletal disorders

AU - Ogden, John A.

AU - Alvarez, Richard

AU - Levitt, Richard

AU - Marlow, Marie

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which now is used routinely for urolithiasis, has gained increasing acceptance in Europe for some musculoskeletal problems and has led to the inception of clinical studies in the United States. The authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic effects of shock waves on human musculoskeletal tissues, the credibility of published studies on therapeutic applications, and the potential for more widespread application of this modality to various skeletal and near-skeletal disorders. The primary advantage of extracorporeal shock wave therapy is its noninvasive nature and seemingly minimal complications when applied to musculoskeletal tissues.

AB - Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which now is used routinely for urolithiasis, has gained increasing acceptance in Europe for some musculoskeletal problems and has led to the inception of clinical studies in the United States. The authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic effects of shock waves on human musculoskeletal tissues, the credibility of published studies on therapeutic applications, and the potential for more widespread application of this modality to various skeletal and near-skeletal disorders. The primary advantage of extracorporeal shock wave therapy is its noninvasive nature and seemingly minimal complications when applied to musculoskeletal tissues.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034991080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034991080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00003086-200106000-00005

DO - 10.1097/00003086-200106000-00005

M3 - Article

SP - 22

EP - 40

JO - Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

JF - Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

SN - 0009-921X

IS - 387

ER -