Shockwave therapy for chronic proximal plantar fasciitis

A meta-analysis

John A. Ogden, Richard Alvarez, Marie Marlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Utilizing meta-analysis, the authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic and therapeutic effects of shockwaves on patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and the credibility of these published studies. Methods: Meta-analysis is a systematic method for statistical analysis that combines data from various independent studies, allowing the assessment of potential benefits of various treatments when conclusions based on individual studies may be difficult to evaluate. We hypothesized that extracorporeal shockwave therapy provided a reasonable nonoperative therapeutic alternative to surgical intervention in the treatment of chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. Results: Eight of 20 published studies fulfilled our type A to C criteria for acceptable studies of sufficient duration (one year or more after treatment). These eight studies involved 840 patients, with success rates of as much as 88%. The other 12 studies had methodological variables or lack of appropriate follow-up data that would limit their validity, although the success rates were comparable to the A to C studies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that the directed application of shockwaves to the enthesis of the plantar fascia at the inferior calcaneus is a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic, recalcitrant heel pain syndrome that has been refractory to other commonly used nonoperative therapies. The results suggest that this therapeutic procedure should be considered before any surgical intervention, and may be preferable prior to cortisone injection, which has a recognized risk of rupture of the plantar fascia and a frequent recurrence of symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-308
Number of pages8
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Plantar Fasciitis
Meta-Analysis
Fascia
Therapeutics
Calcaneus
Statistical Data Interpretation
Heel
Cortisone
Therapeutic Uses
Rupture
Recurrence
Pain
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Shockwave therapy for chronic proximal plantar fasciitis : A meta-analysis. / Ogden, John A.; Alvarez, Richard; Marlow, Marie.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.01.2002, p. 301-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{697e40a82ccb4a26aac4db9555c36f88,
title = "Shockwave therapy for chronic proximal plantar fasciitis: A meta-analysis",
abstract = "Purpose: Utilizing meta-analysis, the authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic and therapeutic effects of shockwaves on patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and the credibility of these published studies. Methods: Meta-analysis is a systematic method for statistical analysis that combines data from various independent studies, allowing the assessment of potential benefits of various treatments when conclusions based on individual studies may be difficult to evaluate. We hypothesized that extracorporeal shockwave therapy provided a reasonable nonoperative therapeutic alternative to surgical intervention in the treatment of chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. Results: Eight of 20 published studies fulfilled our type A to C criteria for acceptable studies of sufficient duration (one year or more after treatment). These eight studies involved 840 patients, with success rates of as much as 88{\%}. The other 12 studies had methodological variables or lack of appropriate follow-up data that would limit their validity, although the success rates were comparable to the A to C studies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that the directed application of shockwaves to the enthesis of the plantar fascia at the inferior calcaneus is a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic, recalcitrant heel pain syndrome that has been refractory to other commonly used nonoperative therapies. The results suggest that this therapeutic procedure should be considered before any surgical intervention, and may be preferable prior to cortisone injection, which has a recognized risk of rupture of the plantar fascia and a frequent recurrence of symptoms.",
author = "Ogden, {John A.} and Richard Alvarez and Marie Marlow",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/107110070202300402",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "301--308",
journal = "Foot and Ankle International",
issn = "1071-1007",
publisher = "AOFAS - American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shockwave therapy for chronic proximal plantar fasciitis

T2 - A meta-analysis

AU - Ogden, John A.

AU - Alvarez, Richard

AU - Marlow, Marie

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Utilizing meta-analysis, the authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic and therapeutic effects of shockwaves on patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and the credibility of these published studies. Methods: Meta-analysis is a systematic method for statistical analysis that combines data from various independent studies, allowing the assessment of potential benefits of various treatments when conclusions based on individual studies may be difficult to evaluate. We hypothesized that extracorporeal shockwave therapy provided a reasonable nonoperative therapeutic alternative to surgical intervention in the treatment of chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. Results: Eight of 20 published studies fulfilled our type A to C criteria for acceptable studies of sufficient duration (one year or more after treatment). These eight studies involved 840 patients, with success rates of as much as 88%. The other 12 studies had methodological variables or lack of appropriate follow-up data that would limit their validity, although the success rates were comparable to the A to C studies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that the directed application of shockwaves to the enthesis of the plantar fascia at the inferior calcaneus is a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic, recalcitrant heel pain syndrome that has been refractory to other commonly used nonoperative therapies. The results suggest that this therapeutic procedure should be considered before any surgical intervention, and may be preferable prior to cortisone injection, which has a recognized risk of rupture of the plantar fascia and a frequent recurrence of symptoms.

AB - Purpose: Utilizing meta-analysis, the authors have reviewed the available literature to assess the biologic and therapeutic effects of shockwaves on patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and the credibility of these published studies. Methods: Meta-analysis is a systematic method for statistical analysis that combines data from various independent studies, allowing the assessment of potential benefits of various treatments when conclusions based on individual studies may be difficult to evaluate. We hypothesized that extracorporeal shockwave therapy provided a reasonable nonoperative therapeutic alternative to surgical intervention in the treatment of chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. Results: Eight of 20 published studies fulfilled our type A to C criteria for acceptable studies of sufficient duration (one year or more after treatment). These eight studies involved 840 patients, with success rates of as much as 88%. The other 12 studies had methodological variables or lack of appropriate follow-up data that would limit their validity, although the success rates were comparable to the A to C studies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that the directed application of shockwaves to the enthesis of the plantar fascia at the inferior calcaneus is a safe and effective nonsurgical method for treating chronic, recalcitrant heel pain syndrome that has been refractory to other commonly used nonoperative therapies. The results suggest that this therapeutic procedure should be considered before any surgical intervention, and may be preferable prior to cortisone injection, which has a recognized risk of rupture of the plantar fascia and a frequent recurrence of symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036231519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036231519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/107110070202300402

DO - 10.1177/107110070202300402

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 301

EP - 308

JO - Foot and Ankle International

JF - Foot and Ankle International

SN - 1071-1007

IS - 4

ER -