Short- and long-term effects of auxiliary labels on patient knowledge of precautionary drug information

Candace Brown, B. L. Solovitz, S. G. Bryant, B. G. Guernsey, S. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of auxiliary prescription labels in educating outpatients about medicines at two different time periods. Five hundred fifty-nine patients were randomly assigned either to an experimental group or a control group; each person in the experimental group received a prescription bottle to which one study auxiliary label ('sticker') had been affixed, and those in the control group received bottles with no study sticker attached. Patients were interviewed by telephone approximately one week or two months after prescription pick up. Patients who had the study sticker affixed to their prescription bottle were significantly more knowledgeable after one week about precautionary information than those patients who did not receive stickers; however, sticker-group patients receiving the delayed interview incorrectly attributed many precautions to their medication. This is the first controlled study to document that auxiliary labels increase short-term knowledge about medications, and to suggest that the same labels may result in an inappropriate generalization over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)470-474
Number of pages5
JournalDrug Intelligence and Clinical Pharmacy
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Medication Knowledge
Prescriptions
Control Groups
Telephone
Outpatients
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Short- and long-term effects of auxiliary labels on patient knowledge of precautionary drug information. / Brown, Candace; Solovitz, B. L.; Bryant, S. G.; Guernsey, B. G.; Fisher, S.

In: Drug Intelligence and Clinical Pharmacy, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.01.1988, p. 470-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Candace ; Solovitz, B. L. ; Bryant, S. G. ; Guernsey, B. G. ; Fisher, S. / Short- and long-term effects of auxiliary labels on patient knowledge of precautionary drug information. In: Drug Intelligence and Clinical Pharmacy. 1988 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 470-474.
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