Shotgun injuries of the upper extremity

Edward Luce, Ward O. Griffen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although most reports of civilian gunshot injuries consist mainly of wounds inflicted by handguns, shotgun wounds deserve special consideration. Long-range shotgun wounds rarely pose a problem; however, medium-and close-range wounds of the penetrating and perforating type may inflict substantial soft-tissue loss, bone defects and comminution, and loss of nerve and vessel continuity. Because of the complex and multiple system involvement by shotgun wounds, a greater challenge exists to obtain a successful, functional result. The challenge is most appropriately met by an aggressive approach of early operative exploration and debridement of the wound, internal stabilization of the bony fragments, vascular repair when indicated, and exploration and identification of nerve deficits, followed by an early wound closure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-492
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Firearms
Upper Extremity
Wounds and Injuries
Penetrating Wounds
Debridement
Blood Vessels
Bone and Bones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Shotgun injuries of the upper extremity. / Luce, Edward; Griffen, Ward O.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 18, No. 7, 01.01.1978, p. 487-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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