Sickle cell disease and fever: Is inpatient treatment always warranted?

Jonathan Mccullers, W. E. Hardwick, R. Berkow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of outpatient treatment for sickle cell disease and fever have led to a revaluation of the current protocol for inpatient treatment of these patients at this institution. A retrospective chart review was conducted for a recent two year period, and criteria suggested in these studies were applied to this population in an attempt to predict outcome if the current protocol was changed. Stratification of 226 admissions into a group requiring inpatient therapy either for concomitant reasons for admission or recognized risk factors for sepsis, and a group who could be treated on an outpatient basis yielded groups of 128 and 98 patients, respectively. One death, several case of bacteremia or sepsis, and frequent morbidity occurred in the inpatient group. No morbidity or mortality and only one case of asymptomatic bacteremia occurred in the outpatient group. Based on recent reports, we believe initial out-patient therapy for asymptomatic bacteremia until culture results are available to be safe and efficacious. We conclude that our current protocol for treatment of sickle cell disease and fever should be altered to allow outpatient treatment in selected cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume44
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Anemia
Inpatients
Fever
Outpatients
Bacteremia
Clinical Protocols
Sepsis
Morbidity
Therapeutics
Safety
Mortality
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Sickle cell disease and fever : Is inpatient treatment always warranted? / Mccullers, Jonathan; Hardwick, W. E.; Berkow, R.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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