Significance of hypo- and hypernatremia in chronic kidney disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract Both hypo- and hypernatremia are common conditions, especially in hospitalized patients and in patients with various comorbid conditions such as congestive heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Abnormal serum sodium levels have been associated with increased mortality in numerous observational studies. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a group with a high prevalence of comorbid conditions that could predispose to dysnatremias. In addition, the failing kidney is also characterized by a gradual development of hyposthenuria, and even isosthenuria, which results in further predisposition to the development of hypo- and hypernatremia in those with advancing stages of CKD. To date, there has been a paucity of populationwide assessments of the incidence and prevalence of dysnatremias, their clinical characteristics and the outcomes associated with them in patients with various stages of CKD. We review the physiology and pathophysiology of water homeostasis with special emphasis on changes occurring in CKD, the outcomes associated with abnormal serum sodium in patients with normal kidney function and the results of recent studies in patients with various stages of CKD, which indicate a substantial incidence and prevalence and significant adverse outcomes associated with dysnatremias in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)891-898
Number of pages8
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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Hypernatremia
Hyponatremia
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Sodium
Kidney
Incidence
Serum
Liver Cirrhosis
Observational Studies
Homeostasis
Heart Failure
Mortality
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Significance of hypo- and hypernatremia in chronic kidney disease. / Kovesdy, Csaba.

In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.05.2012, p. 891-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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