Simplified lansoprazole suspension - A liquid formulation of lansoprazole - Effectively suppresses intragastric acidity when administered through a gastrostomy

Virender K. Sharma, Rajeev Vasudeva, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Lansoprazole suppresses intragastric acidity when given as nonencapsulated intact granules. Because the administration of granules via small-bore tubes may still be problematic, we studied the effect of a liquid formulation of lansoprazole obtained by suspending the contents of a standard 30-mg capsule in 10 cc of 8.4% NaHCO3. METHODS: Six men with an established gastrostomy had a baseline 24-h intragastric pH study. Through the gastrostomy, they then received 7 days of once-daily dosing with 30 mg lansoprazole as intact granules in orange juice. After a 7-day washout period, they then received 7 days of once-daily dosing with the liquid formulation. Intragastric pH monitoring was repeated after each dosing period. RESULTS: Baseline mean intragastric pH was 1.8 ± 0.5 (SD). This increased to 4.5 ± 0.5 with lansoprazole granules in orange juice, and to 5.1 ± 1.1 after the liquid formulation. At baseline, intragastric pH was >3, 4, and 5 for 19.5%, 12.7%, and 8.1%, respectively, of the 24-h recording period. Corresponding values after lansoprazole granules in orange juice were 77.5%, 67%, and 49.6% (p < 0.01 for each comparison with baseline). After the liquid formulation, the corresponding values were 84%, 77.9%, and 65.9% respectively (p < 0.01 for each comparison with baseline; p > 0.05 for each comparison with lansoprazole granules in orange juice). CONCLUSIONS: A liquid formulation of lansoprazole suppressed intragastric acidity when given through a gastrostomy. The degree of suppression was comparable to that obtained with intact nonencapsulated granules in orange juice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1813-1817
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume94
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Lansoprazole
Gastrostomy
Suspensions
Capsules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

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Simplified lansoprazole suspension - A liquid formulation of lansoprazole - Effectively suppresses intragastric acidity when administered through a gastrostomy. / Sharma, Virender K.; Vasudeva, Rajeev; Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 94, No. 7, 01.07.1999, p. 1813-1817.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Lansoprazole suppresses intragastric acidity when given as nonencapsulated intact granules. Because the administration of granules via small-bore tubes may still be problematic, we studied the effect of a liquid formulation of lansoprazole obtained by suspending the contents of a standard 30-mg capsule in 10 cc of 8.4{\%} NaHCO3. METHODS: Six men with an established gastrostomy had a baseline 24-h intragastric pH study. Through the gastrostomy, they then received 7 days of once-daily dosing with 30 mg lansoprazole as intact granules in orange juice. After a 7-day washout period, they then received 7 days of once-daily dosing with the liquid formulation. Intragastric pH monitoring was repeated after each dosing period. RESULTS: Baseline mean intragastric pH was 1.8 ± 0.5 (SD). This increased to 4.5 ± 0.5 with lansoprazole granules in orange juice, and to 5.1 ± 1.1 after the liquid formulation. At baseline, intragastric pH was >3, 4, and 5 for 19.5{\%}, 12.7{\%}, and 8.1{\%}, respectively, of the 24-h recording period. Corresponding values after lansoprazole granules in orange juice were 77.5{\%}, 67{\%}, and 49.6{\%} (p < 0.01 for each comparison with baseline). After the liquid formulation, the corresponding values were 84{\%}, 77.9{\%}, and 65.9{\%} respectively (p < 0.01 for each comparison with baseline; p > 0.05 for each comparison with lansoprazole granules in orange juice). CONCLUSIONS: A liquid formulation of lansoprazole suppressed intragastric acidity when given through a gastrostomy. The degree of suppression was comparable to that obtained with intact nonencapsulated granules in orange juice.",
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