Simulation-based educational curriculum for fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture improves operator confidence and reduces patient dose

Austin R. Faulkner, Austin Bourgeois, Yong Bradley, Kathleen B. Hudson, Robert Heidel, Alexander Pasciak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture (FGLP) is a commonly performed procedure with increased success rates relative to bedside technique. However, FGLP also exposes both patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a simulation-based FGLP training program using an original, inexpensive lumbar spine phantom could improve operator confidence and efficiency, while also reducing patient dose. Materials and Methods: A didactic and simulation-based FGLP curriculum was designed, including a 1-hour lecture and hands-on training with a lumbar spine phantom prototype developed at our institution. Six incoming post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) radiology residents completed a short survey before taking the course, and each resident practiced 20 simulated FGLPs using the phantom before their first clinical procedure. Data from the 114 lumbar punctures (LPs) performed by the six trained residents (prospective cohort) were compared to data from 514 LPs performed by 17 residents who did not receive simulation-based training (retrospective cohort). Fluoroscopy time (FT), FGLP success rate, and indication were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in average FT for the 114 procedures performed by the prospective study cohort compared to the 514 procedures performed by the retrospective cohort. This held true for all procedures in aggregate, LPs for myelography, and all procedures performed for a diagnostic indication. Aggregate FT for the prospective group (0.87±0.68minutes) was significantly lower compared to the retrospective group (1.09±0.65minutes) and resulted in a 25% reduction in average FT (P = 002). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of failed FGLPs between the two groups. Conclusions: Our simulation-based FGLP curriculum resulted in improved operator confidence and reduced FT. These changes suggest that resident procedure efficiency was improved, whereas patient dose was reduced. The FGLP training program was implemented by radiology residents and required a minimal investment of time and resources. The LP spine phantom used during training was inexpensive, durable, and effective. In addition, the phantom is compatible with multiple modalities including fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasound and could be easily adapted to other applications such as facet injections or joint arthrograms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)668-673
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Spinal Puncture
Curriculum
Fluoroscopy
Spine
Radiology
Education
Myelography
Ionizing Radiation
Joints
Tomography
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Simulation-based educational curriculum for fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture improves operator confidence and reduces patient dose. / Faulkner, Austin R.; Bourgeois, Austin; Bradley, Yong; Hudson, Kathleen B.; Heidel, Robert; Pasciak, Alexander.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 668-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{605d0577b887426894d2b95e78deff7a,
title = "Simulation-based educational curriculum for fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture improves operator confidence and reduces patient dose",
abstract = "Rationale and Objectives: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture (FGLP) is a commonly performed procedure with increased success rates relative to bedside technique. However, FGLP also exposes both patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a simulation-based FGLP training program using an original, inexpensive lumbar spine phantom could improve operator confidence and efficiency, while also reducing patient dose. Materials and Methods: A didactic and simulation-based FGLP curriculum was designed, including a 1-hour lecture and hands-on training with a lumbar spine phantom prototype developed at our institution. Six incoming post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) radiology residents completed a short survey before taking the course, and each resident practiced 20 simulated FGLPs using the phantom before their first clinical procedure. Data from the 114 lumbar punctures (LPs) performed by the six trained residents (prospective cohort) were compared to data from 514 LPs performed by 17 residents who did not receive simulation-based training (retrospective cohort). Fluoroscopy time (FT), FGLP success rate, and indication were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in average FT for the 114 procedures performed by the prospective study cohort compared to the 514 procedures performed by the retrospective cohort. This held true for all procedures in aggregate, LPs for myelography, and all procedures performed for a diagnostic indication. Aggregate FT for the prospective group (0.87±0.68minutes) was significantly lower compared to the retrospective group (1.09±0.65minutes) and resulted in a 25{\%} reduction in average FT (P = 002). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of failed FGLPs between the two groups. Conclusions: Our simulation-based FGLP curriculum resulted in improved operator confidence and reduced FT. These changes suggest that resident procedure efficiency was improved, whereas patient dose was reduced. The FGLP training program was implemented by radiology residents and required a minimal investment of time and resources. The LP spine phantom used during training was inexpensive, durable, and effective. In addition, the phantom is compatible with multiple modalities including fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasound and could be easily adapted to other applications such as facet injections or joint arthrograms.",
author = "Faulkner, {Austin R.} and Austin Bourgeois and Yong Bradley and Hudson, {Kathleen B.} and Robert Heidel and Alexander Pasciak",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.acra.2014.12.024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "668--673",
journal = "Academic Radiology",
issn = "1076-6332",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simulation-based educational curriculum for fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture improves operator confidence and reduces patient dose

AU - Faulkner, Austin R.

AU - Bourgeois, Austin

AU - Bradley, Yong

AU - Hudson, Kathleen B.

AU - Heidel, Robert

AU - Pasciak, Alexander

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Rationale and Objectives: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture (FGLP) is a commonly performed procedure with increased success rates relative to bedside technique. However, FGLP also exposes both patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a simulation-based FGLP training program using an original, inexpensive lumbar spine phantom could improve operator confidence and efficiency, while also reducing patient dose. Materials and Methods: A didactic and simulation-based FGLP curriculum was designed, including a 1-hour lecture and hands-on training with a lumbar spine phantom prototype developed at our institution. Six incoming post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) radiology residents completed a short survey before taking the course, and each resident practiced 20 simulated FGLPs using the phantom before their first clinical procedure. Data from the 114 lumbar punctures (LPs) performed by the six trained residents (prospective cohort) were compared to data from 514 LPs performed by 17 residents who did not receive simulation-based training (retrospective cohort). Fluoroscopy time (FT), FGLP success rate, and indication were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in average FT for the 114 procedures performed by the prospective study cohort compared to the 514 procedures performed by the retrospective cohort. This held true for all procedures in aggregate, LPs for myelography, and all procedures performed for a diagnostic indication. Aggregate FT for the prospective group (0.87±0.68minutes) was significantly lower compared to the retrospective group (1.09±0.65minutes) and resulted in a 25% reduction in average FT (P = 002). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of failed FGLPs between the two groups. Conclusions: Our simulation-based FGLP curriculum resulted in improved operator confidence and reduced FT. These changes suggest that resident procedure efficiency was improved, whereas patient dose was reduced. The FGLP training program was implemented by radiology residents and required a minimal investment of time and resources. The LP spine phantom used during training was inexpensive, durable, and effective. In addition, the phantom is compatible with multiple modalities including fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasound and could be easily adapted to other applications such as facet injections or joint arthrograms.

AB - Rationale and Objectives: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture (FGLP) is a commonly performed procedure with increased success rates relative to bedside technique. However, FGLP also exposes both patient and staff to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a simulation-based FGLP training program using an original, inexpensive lumbar spine phantom could improve operator confidence and efficiency, while also reducing patient dose. Materials and Methods: A didactic and simulation-based FGLP curriculum was designed, including a 1-hour lecture and hands-on training with a lumbar spine phantom prototype developed at our institution. Six incoming post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) radiology residents completed a short survey before taking the course, and each resident practiced 20 simulated FGLPs using the phantom before their first clinical procedure. Data from the 114 lumbar punctures (LPs) performed by the six trained residents (prospective cohort) were compared to data from 514 LPs performed by 17 residents who did not receive simulation-based training (retrospective cohort). Fluoroscopy time (FT), FGLP success rate, and indication were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in average FT for the 114 procedures performed by the prospective study cohort compared to the 514 procedures performed by the retrospective cohort. This held true for all procedures in aggregate, LPs for myelography, and all procedures performed for a diagnostic indication. Aggregate FT for the prospective group (0.87±0.68minutes) was significantly lower compared to the retrospective group (1.09±0.65minutes) and resulted in a 25% reduction in average FT (P = 002). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of failed FGLPs between the two groups. Conclusions: Our simulation-based FGLP curriculum resulted in improved operator confidence and reduced FT. These changes suggest that resident procedure efficiency was improved, whereas patient dose was reduced. The FGLP training program was implemented by radiology residents and required a minimal investment of time and resources. The LP spine phantom used during training was inexpensive, durable, and effective. In addition, the phantom is compatible with multiple modalities including fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasound and could be easily adapted to other applications such as facet injections or joint arthrograms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926636016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926636016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.acra.2014.12.024

DO - 10.1016/j.acra.2014.12.024

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 668

EP - 673

JO - Academic Radiology

JF - Academic Radiology

SN - 1076-6332

IS - 5

ER -