Single center experience with oxybutynin transdermal system (patch) for management of symptoms related to non-neuropathic overactive bladder in children

An attractive, well tolerated alternative form of administration

Joseph Gleason, Catherine Daniels, Katharine Williams, Abby Varghese, Martin A. Koyle, Darius J. Bägli, Joao L. Pippi Salle, Armando J. Lorenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Oxybutynin is the current gold standard drug for management of overactive bladder (OAB) in children, but can have significant side effects or be difficult to administer in multiple daily doses. Herein, we report our experience with transdermal oxybutynin patch (TOP) as an alternative in a selected patient population without neuropathic compromise.

Materials and methods Consecutive patients assessed in a pediatric urology clinic over a 1-year period, diagnosed with OAB with minimum follow-up of 3 months, were included. TOP starting dose was 3.9 mg/day based on product design (Oxytrol). Demographics and outcomes data were retrospectively collected. Symptomatic response was defined as improvement or resolution of lower urinary tract symptoms.

Results 35 children met inclusion criteria (mean age 8 years, range 4-16). Overall, 97% reported good symptom response. The main side effect was skin irritation at TOP site (35%), leading to discontinuation in 20%. There were no reports of other significant side effects. Mean bladder capacity increased from 104 ml to 148 ml at follow-up.

Conclusions Our data suggest that TOP is a viable alternative for children with non-neuropathic OAB who do not tolerate other formulations of oxybutynin. These findings highlight the potential benefit of transdermal drug delivery in the pediatric setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-757
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Urology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Transdermal Patch
Overactive Urinary Bladder
Pediatrics
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Urology
oxybutynin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Urinary Bladder
Demography
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Single center experience with oxybutynin transdermal system (patch) for management of symptoms related to non-neuropathic overactive bladder in children : An attractive, well tolerated alternative form of administration. / Gleason, Joseph; Daniels, Catherine; Williams, Katharine; Varghese, Abby; Koyle, Martin A.; Bägli, Darius J.; Pippi Salle, Joao L.; Lorenzo, Armando J.

In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 753-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gleason, Joseph ; Daniels, Catherine ; Williams, Katharine ; Varghese, Abby ; Koyle, Martin A. ; Bägli, Darius J. ; Pippi Salle, Joao L. ; Lorenzo, Armando J. / Single center experience with oxybutynin transdermal system (patch) for management of symptoms related to non-neuropathic overactive bladder in children : An attractive, well tolerated alternative form of administration. In: Journal of Pediatric Urology. 2014 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 753-757.
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