Sistas taking a stand for breast cancer research (STAR) study

A community-based participatory genetic research study to enhance participation and breast cancer equity among African American women in Memphis, TN

Alana Smith, Gregory Vidal, Elizabeth Pritchard, Ryan Blue, Michelle Martin, Lashanta J. Rice, Gwendolynn Brown, Athena Davenport

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African American women are substantially underrepresented in breast cancer genetic research studies and clinical trials, yet they are more likely to die from breast cancer. Lack of trust in the medical community is a major barrier preventing the successful recruitment of African Americans into research studies. When considering the city of Memphis, TN, where the percentage of African Americans is significantly higher than the national average and it has a high rate of breast cancer mortality inequities among African American women, we evaluated the feasibility of utilizing a community-based participatory (CBPR) approach for recruiting African American women into a breast cancer genetic study, called the Sistas Taking A Stand for Breast Cancer Research (STAR) study. From June 2016 and December 2017, African American women age 18 and above were recruited to provide a 2 mL saliva specimen and complete a health questionnaire. A total of 364 African American women provided a saliva sample and completed the health questionnaire. Greater than 85% agreed to be contacted for future studies. Educational workshops on the importance of participating in cancer genetic research studies, followed by question and answer sessions, were most successful in recruitment. Overall, the participants expressed a strong interest and a willingness to participate in the STAR study. Our findings highlight the importance of implementing a CBPR approach that provides an educational component detailing the importance of participating in cancer genetic research studies and that includes prominent community advocates to build trust within the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2899
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 18 2018

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Genetic Research
African Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Research
Saliva
Health
Neoplasms
Clinical Trials
Education
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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title = "Sistas taking a stand for breast cancer research (STAR) study: A community-based participatory genetic research study to enhance participation and breast cancer equity among African American women in Memphis, TN",
abstract = "African American women are substantially underrepresented in breast cancer genetic research studies and clinical trials, yet they are more likely to die from breast cancer. Lack of trust in the medical community is a major barrier preventing the successful recruitment of African Americans into research studies. When considering the city of Memphis, TN, where the percentage of African Americans is significantly higher than the national average and it has a high rate of breast cancer mortality inequities among African American women, we evaluated the feasibility of utilizing a community-based participatory (CBPR) approach for recruiting African American women into a breast cancer genetic study, called the Sistas Taking A Stand for Breast Cancer Research (STAR) study. From June 2016 and December 2017, African American women age 18 and above were recruited to provide a 2 mL saliva specimen and complete a health questionnaire. A total of 364 African American women provided a saliva sample and completed the health questionnaire. Greater than 85{\%} agreed to be contacted for future studies. Educational workshops on the importance of participating in cancer genetic research studies, followed by question and answer sessions, were most successful in recruitment. Overall, the participants expressed a strong interest and a willingness to participate in the STAR study. Our findings highlight the importance of implementing a CBPR approach that provides an educational component detailing the importance of participating in cancer genetic research studies and that includes prominent community advocates to build trust within the community.",
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