Skeletal muscle damage and recovery.

Christine E. Kasper, Laura Talbot, Jean M. Gaines

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Muscular strength is essential for recovery after an acute illness. Disuse atrophy of muscle begins within 4 hours of the start of bed rest resulting in decreases in muscle mass, muscle cell diameter, and the number of muscle fibers. Strenuous exercise of atrophic muscle can lead to muscle damage including sarcolemmal disruption, distortion of the myofibrils' contractile components, and cytoskeletal damage. Assessment of skeletal muscle for disuse atrophy is done clinically at the bedside through strength assessment. Examination of the muscle itself can be conducted through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, whereas muscle strength can be quantified with a computerized dynamometer. Biochemical markers, including creatine kinase and troponin, also are available for the assessment of skeletal muscle damage. Activity management in the critical care environment focuses on an individualized plan, developed in cooperation with the recovering patient, with the goal of preserving and improving atrophic skeletal muscle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-247
Number of pages11
JournalAACN clinical issues
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Atrophic Muscular Disorders
Bed Rest
Troponin
Muscular Atrophy
Myofibrils
Muscle Strength
Critical Care
Creatine Kinase
Muscle Cells
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Cell Count
Biomarkers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Care Planning
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Skeletal muscle damage and recovery. / Kasper, Christine E.; Talbot, Laura; Gaines, Jean M.

In: AACN clinical issues, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 237-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kasper, Christine E. ; Talbot, Laura ; Gaines, Jean M. / Skeletal muscle damage and recovery. In: AACN clinical issues. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 237-247.
@article{851a6780b93f48188b3022e9ba5634e4,
title = "Skeletal muscle damage and recovery.",
abstract = "Muscular strength is essential for recovery after an acute illness. Disuse atrophy of muscle begins within 4 hours of the start of bed rest resulting in decreases in muscle mass, muscle cell diameter, and the number of muscle fibers. Strenuous exercise of atrophic muscle can lead to muscle damage including sarcolemmal disruption, distortion of the myofibrils' contractile components, and cytoskeletal damage. Assessment of skeletal muscle for disuse atrophy is done clinically at the bedside through strength assessment. Examination of the muscle itself can be conducted through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, whereas muscle strength can be quantified with a computerized dynamometer. Biochemical markers, including creatine kinase and troponin, also are available for the assessment of skeletal muscle damage. Activity management in the critical care environment focuses on an individualized plan, developed in cooperation with the recovering patient, with the goal of preserving and improving atrophic skeletal muscle.",
author = "Kasper, {Christine E.} and Laura Talbot and Gaines, {Jean M.}",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00044067-200205000-00009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "237--247",
journal = "AACN Advanced Critical Care",
issn = "1559-7768",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Skeletal muscle damage and recovery.

AU - Kasper, Christine E.

AU - Talbot, Laura

AU - Gaines, Jean M.

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Muscular strength is essential for recovery after an acute illness. Disuse atrophy of muscle begins within 4 hours of the start of bed rest resulting in decreases in muscle mass, muscle cell diameter, and the number of muscle fibers. Strenuous exercise of atrophic muscle can lead to muscle damage including sarcolemmal disruption, distortion of the myofibrils' contractile components, and cytoskeletal damage. Assessment of skeletal muscle for disuse atrophy is done clinically at the bedside through strength assessment. Examination of the muscle itself can be conducted through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, whereas muscle strength can be quantified with a computerized dynamometer. Biochemical markers, including creatine kinase and troponin, also are available for the assessment of skeletal muscle damage. Activity management in the critical care environment focuses on an individualized plan, developed in cooperation with the recovering patient, with the goal of preserving and improving atrophic skeletal muscle.

AB - Muscular strength is essential for recovery after an acute illness. Disuse atrophy of muscle begins within 4 hours of the start of bed rest resulting in decreases in muscle mass, muscle cell diameter, and the number of muscle fibers. Strenuous exercise of atrophic muscle can lead to muscle damage including sarcolemmal disruption, distortion of the myofibrils' contractile components, and cytoskeletal damage. Assessment of skeletal muscle for disuse atrophy is done clinically at the bedside through strength assessment. Examination of the muscle itself can be conducted through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, whereas muscle strength can be quantified with a computerized dynamometer. Biochemical markers, including creatine kinase and troponin, also are available for the assessment of skeletal muscle damage. Activity management in the critical care environment focuses on an individualized plan, developed in cooperation with the recovering patient, with the goal of preserving and improving atrophic skeletal muscle.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036584458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036584458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00044067-200205000-00009

DO - 10.1097/00044067-200205000-00009

M3 - Review article

VL - 13

SP - 237

EP - 247

JO - AACN Advanced Critical Care

JF - AACN Advanced Critical Care

SN - 1559-7768

IS - 2

ER -