Skeletal muscle strength as a predictor of all-cause mortality in healthy men

E. Metter, Laura Talbot, Matthew Schrager, Robin Conwit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

463 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low muscle strength is associated with mortality, presumably as a result of low muscle mass (sarcopenia) and physical inactivity. Grip strength was longitudinally collected in 1071 men over a 25-year period. Muscle mass was estimated by using 24-hour creatinine excretion and physical activity values, obtained by questionnaire. Survival analysis examined the impact of grip strength and rate of change in strength on all-cause mortality over 40 years. Lower and declining strength are associated with increased mortality, independent of physical activity and muscle mass. In men <60 years, rate of loss of strength was more important than the actual levels. In men ≥60 years, strength was more protective than the rate of loss, which persisted when muscle mass was considered. Strength and rate of change in strength contribute to the impact of sarcopenia on mortality. Although muscle mass and physical activity are important, they do not completely account for the impact of strength and changes in strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)B359-B365
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume57
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Muscle Strength
Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Mortality
Sarcopenia
Hand Strength
Exercise
Survival Analysis
Creatinine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Skeletal muscle strength as a predictor of all-cause mortality in healthy men. / Metter, E.; Talbot, Laura; Schrager, Matthew; Conwit, Robin.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 57, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. B359-B365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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