Sleep-dependent oscillatory synchronization

A role in fear memory consolidation

Michael S. Totty, Logan A. Chesney, Phillip A. Geist, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation through the facilitation of neuronal plasticity; however, how sleep accomplishes this remains to be completely understood. It has previously been demonstrated that neural oscillations are an intrinsic mechanism by which the brain precisely controls neural ensembles. Inter-regional synchronization of these oscillations is also known to facilitate long-range communication and long-term potentiation (LTP). In the present study, we investigated how the characteristic rhythms found in local field potentials (LFPs) during non-REM and REM sleep play a role in emotional memory consolidation. Chronically implanted bipolar electrodes in the lateral amygdala (LA), dorsal and ventral hippocampus (DH, VH), and the infra-limbic (IL), and pre-limbic (PL) prefrontal cortex were used to record LFPs across sleep-wake activity following each day of a Pavlovian cued fear conditioning paradigm. This resulted in three principle findings: (1) theta rhythms during REM sleep are highly synchronized between regions; (2) the extent of inter-regional synchronization during REM and non-REM sleep is altered by FC and EX; (3) the mean phase difference of synchronization between the LA and VH during REM sleep predicts changes in freezing after cued fear extinction. These results both oppose a currently proposed model of sleep-dependent memory consolidation and provide a novel finding which suggests that the role of REM sleep theta rhythms in memory consolidation may rely more on the relative phase-shift between neural oscillations, rather than the extent of phase synchronization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number49
JournalFrontiers in Neural Circuits
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2017

Fingerprint

Fear
REM Sleep
Sleep
Theta Rhythm
Amygdala
Implanted Electrodes
Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Potentiation
Prefrontal Cortex
Freezing
Hippocampus
Communication
Memory Consolidation
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Sleep-dependent oscillatory synchronization : A role in fear memory consolidation. / Totty, Michael S.; Chesney, Logan A.; Geist, Phillip A.; Datta, Subimal.

In: Frontiers in Neural Circuits, Vol. 11, 49, 06.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Totty, Michael S. ; Chesney, Logan A. ; Geist, Phillip A. ; Datta, Subimal. / Sleep-dependent oscillatory synchronization : A role in fear memory consolidation. In: Frontiers in Neural Circuits. 2017 ; Vol. 11.
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