Slowing of contractile properties in quail skeletal muscle with aging

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Abstract

The effect of aging on muscle contractile function was examined in the anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle of Japanese quails aged 8 weeks (young adults), 26 weeks, 60 weeks, or 90 weeks (old birds). In vitro contractile measures of the ALD were made at 25 °C (stimulus pulse = 0.1 ms). Twitch contraction time in 90-week-old muscles was significantly greater than 8 to 26-week-old muscles (150 ± 8 ms vs 168 ± 18 ms). Similarly, one-half relaxation time of the twitch was increased in the ALD from old birds (221 ±17 ms) relative to adult birds 8–26 weeks (173 ± 11). Aging produced a greater fusing of twitches at stimulation frequencies of 5 and 10 Hz, and this resulted in a leftward shift of the force-frequency curve at these frequencies. Shortening velocity measured by the force-velocity method (Vmax) decreased from 2.6 ± 0.2 muscle lengthls (mLls) to 1.19 ± 0.02 mLls in 8 and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal velocity of unloaded shortening as measured by the slack test decreased from 3.6 ± 0.7 mLls to 2.4 mLls in 8-week-old and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal tetanic force (60.6 ±3.1 mN) and specific force (11.3 ± 0.3 Nlcm2) were similar in young adult and old muscles. These data indicate that aging induces a slowing of both twitch contractile characteristics and shortening velocity in the ALD, without affecting maximal force capabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)B26-B33
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume50A
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Quail
Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Superficial Back Muscles
Birds
Young Adult
Coturnix

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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title = "Slowing of contractile properties in quail skeletal muscle with aging",
abstract = "The effect of aging on muscle contractile function was examined in the anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle of Japanese quails aged 8 weeks (young adults), 26 weeks, 60 weeks, or 90 weeks (old birds). In vitro contractile measures of the ALD were made at 25 °C (stimulus pulse = 0.1 ms). Twitch contraction time in 90-week-old muscles was significantly greater than 8 to 26-week-old muscles (150 ± 8 ms vs 168 ± 18 ms). Similarly, one-half relaxation time of the twitch was increased in the ALD from old birds (221 ±17 ms) relative to adult birds 8–26 weeks (173 ± 11). Aging produced a greater fusing of twitches at stimulation frequencies of 5 and 10 Hz, and this resulted in a leftward shift of the force-frequency curve at these frequencies. Shortening velocity measured by the force-velocity method (Vmax) decreased from 2.6 ± 0.2 muscle lengthls (mLls) to 1.19 ± 0.02 mLls in 8 and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal velocity of unloaded shortening as measured by the slack test decreased from 3.6 ± 0.7 mLls to 2.4 mLls in 8-week-old and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal tetanic force (60.6 ±3.1 mN) and specific force (11.3 ± 0.3 Nlcm2) were similar in young adult and old muscles. These data indicate that aging induces a slowing of both twitch contractile characteristics and shortening velocity in the ALD, without affecting maximal force capabilities.",
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N2 - The effect of aging on muscle contractile function was examined in the anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle of Japanese quails aged 8 weeks (young adults), 26 weeks, 60 weeks, or 90 weeks (old birds). In vitro contractile measures of the ALD were made at 25 °C (stimulus pulse = 0.1 ms). Twitch contraction time in 90-week-old muscles was significantly greater than 8 to 26-week-old muscles (150 ± 8 ms vs 168 ± 18 ms). Similarly, one-half relaxation time of the twitch was increased in the ALD from old birds (221 ±17 ms) relative to adult birds 8–26 weeks (173 ± 11). Aging produced a greater fusing of twitches at stimulation frequencies of 5 and 10 Hz, and this resulted in a leftward shift of the force-frequency curve at these frequencies. Shortening velocity measured by the force-velocity method (Vmax) decreased from 2.6 ± 0.2 muscle lengthls (mLls) to 1.19 ± 0.02 mLls in 8 and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal velocity of unloaded shortening as measured by the slack test decreased from 3.6 ± 0.7 mLls to 2.4 mLls in 8-week-old and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal tetanic force (60.6 ±3.1 mN) and specific force (11.3 ± 0.3 Nlcm2) were similar in young adult and old muscles. These data indicate that aging induces a slowing of both twitch contractile characteristics and shortening velocity in the ALD, without affecting maximal force capabilities.

AB - The effect of aging on muscle contractile function was examined in the anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle of Japanese quails aged 8 weeks (young adults), 26 weeks, 60 weeks, or 90 weeks (old birds). In vitro contractile measures of the ALD were made at 25 °C (stimulus pulse = 0.1 ms). Twitch contraction time in 90-week-old muscles was significantly greater than 8 to 26-week-old muscles (150 ± 8 ms vs 168 ± 18 ms). Similarly, one-half relaxation time of the twitch was increased in the ALD from old birds (221 ±17 ms) relative to adult birds 8–26 weeks (173 ± 11). Aging produced a greater fusing of twitches at stimulation frequencies of 5 and 10 Hz, and this resulted in a leftward shift of the force-frequency curve at these frequencies. Shortening velocity measured by the force-velocity method (Vmax) decreased from 2.6 ± 0.2 muscle lengthls (mLls) to 1.19 ± 0.02 mLls in 8 and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal velocity of unloaded shortening as measured by the slack test decreased from 3.6 ± 0.7 mLls to 2.4 mLls in 8-week-old and 90-week-old muscles, respectively. Maximal tetanic force (60.6 ±3.1 mN) and specific force (11.3 ± 0.3 Nlcm2) were similar in young adult and old muscles. These data indicate that aging induces a slowing of both twitch contractile characteristics and shortening velocity in the ALD, without affecting maximal force capabilities.

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