Slowly progressive aphasia

Three cases with language, memory, CT and PET data

D. Kempler, E. Metter, W. H. Riege, C. A. Jackson, D. F. Benson, W. R. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three cases of slowly progressive speech and language disturbance were studied at various points post onset (three, five and 15 years respectively). Language, neuropsychological and brain imaging (computer tomography and positron emission tomography) evaluations were completed on all three patients. The data suggest that the syndrome of "progressive aphasia": 1) does not involve a uniform symptom complex; 2) does not necessarily develop into a full blown dementia syndrome; 3) varies greatly in rate of progression from case to case; 4) is associated with normal brain structure (on computer tomography); and 5) is associated with abnormal left temporal lobe metabolism as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). One patient had histological findings consistent with Alzheimer's disease at necropsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-993
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Aphasia
Positron-Emission Tomography
Language
Tomography
Temporal Lobe
Neuroimaging
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Slowly progressive aphasia : Three cases with language, memory, CT and PET data. / Kempler, D.; Metter, E.; Riege, W. H.; Jackson, C. A.; Benson, D. F.; Hanson, W. R.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 53, No. 11, 01.01.1990, p. 987-993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kempler, D. ; Metter, E. ; Riege, W. H. ; Jackson, C. A. ; Benson, D. F. ; Hanson, W. R. / Slowly progressive aphasia : Three cases with language, memory, CT and PET data. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 1990 ; Vol. 53, No. 11. pp. 987-993.
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