Smokers who try E-cigarettes to quit smoking

Findings from a multiethnic study in Hawaii

Pallav Pokhrel, Pebbles Fagan, Melissa Little, Crissy T. Kawamoto, Thaddeus A. Herzog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We characterized smokers who are likely to use electronic or "e-"cigarettes to quit smoking. Methods. We obtained cross-sectional data in 2010-2012 from 1567 adult daily smokers in Hawaii using a paper-and-pencil survey. Analyses were conducted using logistic regression. Results. Of the participants, 13% reported having ever used e-cigarettes to quit smoking. Smokers who had used them reported higher motivation to quit, higher quitting self-efficacy, and longer recent quit duration than did other smokers. Age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.97, 0.99) and Native Hawaiian ethnicity (OR = 0.68; 95% CI = 0.45, 0.99) were inversely associated with increased likelihood of ever using e-cigarettes for cessation. Other significant correlates were higher motivation to quit (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.21), quitting self-efficacy (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.06, 1.36), and ever using US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved cessation aids such as nicotine gum (OR = 3.72; 95% CI = 2.67, 5.19). Conclusions. Smokers who try e-cigarettes to quit smoking appear to be serious about wanting to quit. Despite lack of evidence regarding efficacy, smokers treat e-cigarettes as valid alternatives to FDA-approved cessation aids. Research is needed to test the safety and efficacy of e-cigarettes as cessation aids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume103
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Tobacco Products
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Self Efficacy
United States Food and Drug Administration
Motivation
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Nicotine
Electronic Cigarettes
Logistic Models
Safety
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Smokers who try E-cigarettes to quit smoking : Findings from a multiethnic study in Hawaii. / Pokhrel, Pallav; Fagan, Pebbles; Little, Melissa; Kawamoto, Crissy T.; Herzog, Thaddeus A.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 103, No. 9, 01.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pokhrel, Pallav ; Fagan, Pebbles ; Little, Melissa ; Kawamoto, Crissy T. ; Herzog, Thaddeus A. / Smokers who try E-cigarettes to quit smoking : Findings from a multiethnic study in Hawaii. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2013 ; Vol. 103, No. 9.
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