Smoking and asthma

Megan Stapleton, Amanda Howard-Thompson, Christa George, Robert M. Hoover, Timothy Self

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of the prevalence and adverse effects of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke (SHS) in asthmatics in terms of patient outcomes and response to inhaled corticosteroids. Methods: We searched the English biomedical literature via PubMed, Embase, and Scopus using the terms "smoking and asthma," "secondhand smoke and asthma," "environmental tobacco smoke and asthma," and "smoking/secondhand smoke and corticosteroids." We also reviewed reference lists of identified articles for relevant citations. Results: In asthmatic patients who smoke, disease control is poorer than in asthmatic nonsmokers. Of all forms of SHS, maternal exposure seems to have the largest impact on asthma by increasing the frequency and severity of the disease and decreasing lung function. Asthmatic children exposed to multiple household smokers face an increased risk for respiratory illness-related absences from school, and these effects persist during adolescence but weaken during adulthood. Airway mucosal permeability is increased in smokers, which could lead to increased clearance of inhaled corticosteroids from the airways. Smokers also have decreased histone deacetylase activity, which is necessary for corticosteroids to fully suppress cytokine production, and can lead to corticosteroid resistance. Conclusions: Cigarette smoking and SHS in asthmatics lead to detrimental effects in patient outcomes and effectiveness of steroid therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-322
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Fingerprint

Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Asthma
Smoking
Smoke
Maternal Exposure
Histone Deacetylases
PubMed
Lung Diseases
Tobacco
Permeability
Steroids
Cytokines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Stapleton, M., Howard-Thompson, A., George, C., Hoover, R. M., & Self, T. (2011). Smoking and asthma. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 24(3), 313-322. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2011.03.100180

Smoking and asthma. / Stapleton, Megan; Howard-Thompson, Amanda; George, Christa; Hoover, Robert M.; Self, Timothy.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 313-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Stapleton, M, Howard-Thompson, A, George, C, Hoover, RM & Self, T 2011, 'Smoking and asthma', Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 313-322. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2011.03.100180
Stapleton M, Howard-Thompson A, George C, Hoover RM, Self T. Smoking and asthma. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2011 May 1;24(3):313-322. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2011.03.100180
Stapleton, Megan ; Howard-Thompson, Amanda ; George, Christa ; Hoover, Robert M. ; Self, Timothy. / Smoking and asthma. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 313-322.
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