Smoking and weight loss among smokers with overweight and obesity in look AHEAD

Cara M. Murphy, Damaris J. Rohsenow, Karen Johnson, Rena R. Wing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking cessation is associated with increases in body weight, but little is known about the relationship between participation in a weight loss intervention and smoking. Objective: To determine whether (a) weight losses at 1 year differ as a function of baseline smoking status (never smoker, current smoker, ex-smoker) and (b) participation in a weight loss intervention affects smoking behavior. Method: This analysis addressed these questions using the publicly available database from Look AHEAD, a randomized trial comparing intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) and diabetes support and education (DSE; control condition) among individuals with overweight/obesity and Type 2 diabetes, and included 4,387 participants who had self-reported smoking and objective weight measures available at baseline and at 1 year. Results: Although participants in ILI lost a significantly greater percentage of weight than those in DSE at 1 year (ILI, M = -8.8%, SD = 6.8; DSE, M = -0.7%, SD = 4.7), there were no differences in weight loss outcomes between never smokers (n = 2,297), ex-smokers (n = 2,115), and current smokers (n = 188) within either condition. Participation in ILI was not associated with compensatory smoking or likelihood of quitting smoking or relapsing. Conclusions: Smokers in a weight loss intervention had reductions in weight that were comparable to individuals who did not smoke without any evidence of compensatory smoking to manage eating and appetite. Smokers with obesity should be encouraged to pursue weight loss without concerns regarding the impact on smoking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-406
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Weight Loss
Obesity
Smoking
Life Style
Weights and Measures
Appetite
Smoking Cessation
Smoke
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Eating
Body Weight
Databases
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Smoking and weight loss among smokers with overweight and obesity in look AHEAD. / Murphy, Cara M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; Johnson, Karen; Wing, Rena R.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 399-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, Cara M. ; Rohsenow, Damaris J. ; Johnson, Karen ; Wing, Rena R. / Smoking and weight loss among smokers with overweight and obesity in look AHEAD. In: Health Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 399-406.
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