Smoking cessation

barriers to success and readiness to change.

Alexander B. Guirguis, Shaunta' Chamberlin, Michelle M. Zingone, Anita Airee, Andrea Franks, Amy J. Keenum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking cessation interventions should be individualized based on patient history and readiness for change. The objective of this study was to assess stages of change and key components of smoking and cessation history among a sample of primary care patients. A telephone survey of current or recent smokers identified smoking status, stage of change, motivation, concerns, relapse history, pharmacotherapy, and social support. Of 150 participants, most were within precontemplation (22.7 percent) or contemplation (44.0 percent) stages of change; 14.0 percent were in preparation, 4.7 percent in action, and 14.7 percent in maintenance. The primary motivation for quitting was to improve general health (42.3 percent). The most common cessation-related concerns were: breaking the habit, stress, and weight gain. Pharmacotherapy was discontinued due to adverse events in 31.5 percent of users. Intratreatment social support was reported by 17.5 percent. The most common reasons for relapse were falling back into the habit (36 percent), stressful situations (27 percent), and being around other smokers (25 percent). Targeted interventions are needed for patients in either precontemplation or contemplation stages. Counseling should focus on helping patients resolve barriers to cessation and reasons for relapse, particularly stress and weight management. Pharmacotherapy should be utilized when patients are ready to quit. Increased intratreatment social support and counseling appear warranted to support behavior change and appropriate medication use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-49
Number of pages5
JournalTennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume103
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Smoking Cessation
Social Support
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Habits
Motivation
Counseling
Telephone
Weight Gain
Primary Health Care
Smoking
History
Maintenance
Weights and Measures
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Smoking cessation : barriers to success and readiness to change. / Guirguis, Alexander B.; Chamberlin, Shaunta'; Zingone, Michelle M.; Airee, Anita; Franks, Andrea; Keenum, Amy J.

In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association, Vol. 103, No. 9, 01.01.2010, p. 45-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guirguis, Alexander B. ; Chamberlin, Shaunta' ; Zingone, Michelle M. ; Airee, Anita ; Franks, Andrea ; Keenum, Amy J. / Smoking cessation : barriers to success and readiness to change. In: Tennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association. 2010 ; Vol. 103, No. 9. pp. 45-49.
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