Smoking Cessation for Smokers Not Ready to Quit: Meta-analysis and Cost-effectiveness Analysis

Ayesha Ali, Cameron Kaplan, Karen Derefinko, Robert C. Klesges

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: To provide a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis on smoking interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit, a population that makes up approximately 32% of current smokers. Evidence acquisition: Twenty-two studies on pharmacological, behavioral, and combination smoking-cessation interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit (defined as those who reported they were not ready to quit at the time of the study) published between 2000 and 2017 were analyzed. The effectiveness (measured by the number needed to treat) and cost effectiveness (measured by costs per quit) of interventions were calculated. All data collection and analyses were performed in 2017. Evidence synthesis: Smoking interventions targeting smokers not ready to quit can be as effective as similar interventions for smokers ready to quit; however, costs of intervening on this group may be higher for some intervention types. The most cost-effective interventions identified for this group were those using varenicline and those using behavioral interventions. Conclusions: Updating clinical recommendations to provide cessation interventions for this group is recommended. Further research on development of cost-effective treatments and effective strategies for recruitment and outreach for this group are needed. Additional studies may allow for more nuanced comparisons of treatment types among this group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-262
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Meta-Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Smoking
Numbers Needed To Treat
Time and Motion Studies
Health Care Costs
Pharmacology
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Smoking Cessation for Smokers Not Ready to Quit : Meta-analysis and Cost-effectiveness Analysis. / Ali, Ayesha; Kaplan, Cameron; Derefinko, Karen; Klesges, Robert C.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.08.2018, p. 253-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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