Smoking during pregnancy among Northwest Native Americans

Robert Davis, S. D. Helgerson, P. Waller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is little available information on the smoking habits of Native Americans. The authors used data from the Washington State birth certificate to determine the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy among Native American mothers in Washington State. From 1984 through 1988, 39.8 percent of all Native Americans smoked during their pregnancy. Smoking patterns during pregnancy differed markedly between Native Americans and whites according to maternal age and marital status. The smoking prevalence in Native Americans, adjusted for maternal age and marital status, was 1.3 times higher than that found in Washington State white women. This is the first analysis of statewide smoking rates during pregnancy among Native Americans. The birth certificate can serve as a readily accessible and low cost surveillance system for populations such as Native Americans, who are otherwise difficult to study. Smoking intervention programs need to be targeted at Native Americans, and how their smoking patterns differ from those of the general population needs to be recognized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-69
Number of pages4
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume107
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Smoking
Pregnancy
Birth Certificates
Maternal Age
Marital Status
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy Rate
Habits
Mothers
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Davis, R., Helgerson, S. D., & Waller, P. (1992). Smoking during pregnancy among Northwest Native Americans. Public Health Reports, 107(1), 66-69.

Smoking during pregnancy among Northwest Native Americans. / Davis, Robert; Helgerson, S. D.; Waller, P.

In: Public Health Reports, Vol. 107, No. 1, 1992, p. 66-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, R, Helgerson, SD & Waller, P 1992, 'Smoking during pregnancy among Northwest Native Americans', Public Health Reports, vol. 107, no. 1, pp. 66-69.
Davis, Robert ; Helgerson, S. D. ; Waller, P. / Smoking during pregnancy among Northwest Native Americans. In: Public Health Reports. 1992 ; Vol. 107, No. 1. pp. 66-69.
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