Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II

Neeta Thakur, Melissa Martin, Elizabeth Castellanos, Sam S. Oh, Lindsey A. Roth, Celeste Eng, Emerita Brigino-Buenaventura, Adam Davis, Kelley Meade, Michael A. Lenoir, Harold J. Farber, Shannon Thyne, Saunak Sen, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Luisa N. Borrell, Esteban G. Burchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: African Americans are disproportionately burdened by asthma. We assessed the individual and joint contribution of socioeconomic status (SES) on asthma morbidity among African American youth. Methods: We examined 686 African Americans (8-21 years) with asthma. To account for the joint effects of SES, a composite index was derived from maternal educational attainment, household income, and insurance status. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and joint effect of SES on asthma control. Models were adjusted for age, sex, controller medication use, in utero smoke exposure, family history of asthma, family history of rhinitis, breastfeeding, daycare attendance, and mold exposure. Results: Participants were classified as Poorly Controlled Asthma (40.8%), Partially Controlled Asthma (29.7%), or Controlled Asthma (30.2%). Of the individual SES indicators, low income was the strongest predictor of poor asthma control. Children with low income had worse asthma control than those with higher income (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.92-2.12). The SES index ranged from 4-9. SES was associated with 17% increased odds of poor asthma control with each decrease in the index (95% CI 1.05-1.32). The SES index was associated with asthma-related symptoms, nocturnal awakenings, limited activity, and missed school days. Conclusions: The negative effects of SES were observed along the entire socioeconomic gradient, and the adverse asthma outcomes observed in African American youth were not limited to the very poor. We also found that the SES index may be a more consistent and useful predictor of poor asthma outcomes than each indicator alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-728
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Social Class
African Americans
Asthma
Insurance Coverage
Rhinitis
Breast Feeding
Smoke
Fungi
Logistic Models
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Thakur, N., Martin, M., Castellanos, E., Oh, S. S., Roth, L. A., Eng, C., ... Burchard, E. G. (2014). Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II. Journal of Asthma, 51(7), 720-728. https://doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2014.905593

Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II. / Thakur, Neeta; Martin, Melissa; Castellanos, Elizabeth; Oh, Sam S.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Eng, Celeste; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; Lenoir, Michael A.; Farber, Harold J.; Thyne, Shannon; Sen, Saunak; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Borrell, Luisa N.; Burchard, Esteban G.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 51, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 720-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thakur, N, Martin, M, Castellanos, E, Oh, SS, Roth, LA, Eng, C, Brigino-Buenaventura, E, Davis, A, Meade, K, Lenoir, MA, Farber, HJ, Thyne, S, Sen, S, Bibbins-Domingo, K, Borrell, LN & Burchard, EG 2014, 'Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II', Journal of Asthma, vol. 51, no. 7, pp. 720-728. https://doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2014.905593
Thakur N, Martin M, Castellanos E, Oh SS, Roth LA, Eng C et al. Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II. Journal of Asthma. 2014 Jan 1;51(7):720-728. https://doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2014.905593
Thakur, Neeta ; Martin, Melissa ; Castellanos, Elizabeth ; Oh, Sam S. ; Roth, Lindsey A. ; Eng, Celeste ; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita ; Davis, Adam ; Meade, Kelley ; Lenoir, Michael A. ; Farber, Harold J. ; Thyne, Shannon ; Sen, Saunak ; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten ; Borrell, Luisa N. ; Burchard, Esteban G. / Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II. In: Journal of Asthma. 2014 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 720-728.
@article{bd415e91faff4059bb6e695ac6950309,
title = "Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II",
abstract = "Objective: African Americans are disproportionately burdened by asthma. We assessed the individual and joint contribution of socioeconomic status (SES) on asthma morbidity among African American youth. Methods: We examined 686 African Americans (8-21 years) with asthma. To account for the joint effects of SES, a composite index was derived from maternal educational attainment, household income, and insurance status. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and joint effect of SES on asthma control. Models were adjusted for age, sex, controller medication use, in utero smoke exposure, family history of asthma, family history of rhinitis, breastfeeding, daycare attendance, and mold exposure. Results: Participants were classified as Poorly Controlled Asthma (40.8{\%}), Partially Controlled Asthma (29.7{\%}), or Controlled Asthma (30.2{\%}). Of the individual SES indicators, low income was the strongest predictor of poor asthma control. Children with low income had worse asthma control than those with higher income (OR 1.39; 95{\%} CI 0.92-2.12). The SES index ranged from 4-9. SES was associated with 17{\%} increased odds of poor asthma control with each decrease in the index (95{\%} CI 1.05-1.32). The SES index was associated with asthma-related symptoms, nocturnal awakenings, limited activity, and missed school days. Conclusions: The negative effects of SES were observed along the entire socioeconomic gradient, and the adverse asthma outcomes observed in African American youth were not limited to the very poor. We also found that the SES index may be a more consistent and useful predictor of poor asthma outcomes than each indicator alone.",
author = "Neeta Thakur and Melissa Martin and Elizabeth Castellanos and Oh, {Sam S.} and Roth, {Lindsey A.} and Celeste Eng and Emerita Brigino-Buenaventura and Adam Davis and Kelley Meade and Lenoir, {Michael A.} and Farber, {Harold J.} and Shannon Thyne and Saunak Sen and Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo and Borrell, {Luisa N.} and Burchard, {Esteban G.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/02770903.2014.905593",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "720--728",
journal = "Journal of Asthma",
issn = "0277-0903",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic status and asthma control in African American youth in SAGE II

AU - Thakur, Neeta

AU - Martin, Melissa

AU - Castellanos, Elizabeth

AU - Oh, Sam S.

AU - Roth, Lindsey A.

AU - Eng, Celeste

AU - Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita

AU - Davis, Adam

AU - Meade, Kelley

AU - Lenoir, Michael A.

AU - Farber, Harold J.

AU - Thyne, Shannon

AU - Sen, Saunak

AU - Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

AU - Borrell, Luisa N.

AU - Burchard, Esteban G.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objective: African Americans are disproportionately burdened by asthma. We assessed the individual and joint contribution of socioeconomic status (SES) on asthma morbidity among African American youth. Methods: We examined 686 African Americans (8-21 years) with asthma. To account for the joint effects of SES, a composite index was derived from maternal educational attainment, household income, and insurance status. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and joint effect of SES on asthma control. Models were adjusted for age, sex, controller medication use, in utero smoke exposure, family history of asthma, family history of rhinitis, breastfeeding, daycare attendance, and mold exposure. Results: Participants were classified as Poorly Controlled Asthma (40.8%), Partially Controlled Asthma (29.7%), or Controlled Asthma (30.2%). Of the individual SES indicators, low income was the strongest predictor of poor asthma control. Children with low income had worse asthma control than those with higher income (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.92-2.12). The SES index ranged from 4-9. SES was associated with 17% increased odds of poor asthma control with each decrease in the index (95% CI 1.05-1.32). The SES index was associated with asthma-related symptoms, nocturnal awakenings, limited activity, and missed school days. Conclusions: The negative effects of SES were observed along the entire socioeconomic gradient, and the adverse asthma outcomes observed in African American youth were not limited to the very poor. We also found that the SES index may be a more consistent and useful predictor of poor asthma outcomes than each indicator alone.

AB - Objective: African Americans are disproportionately burdened by asthma. We assessed the individual and joint contribution of socioeconomic status (SES) on asthma morbidity among African American youth. Methods: We examined 686 African Americans (8-21 years) with asthma. To account for the joint effects of SES, a composite index was derived from maternal educational attainment, household income, and insurance status. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and joint effect of SES on asthma control. Models were adjusted for age, sex, controller medication use, in utero smoke exposure, family history of asthma, family history of rhinitis, breastfeeding, daycare attendance, and mold exposure. Results: Participants were classified as Poorly Controlled Asthma (40.8%), Partially Controlled Asthma (29.7%), or Controlled Asthma (30.2%). Of the individual SES indicators, low income was the strongest predictor of poor asthma control. Children with low income had worse asthma control than those with higher income (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.92-2.12). The SES index ranged from 4-9. SES was associated with 17% increased odds of poor asthma control with each decrease in the index (95% CI 1.05-1.32). The SES index was associated with asthma-related symptoms, nocturnal awakenings, limited activity, and missed school days. Conclusions: The negative effects of SES were observed along the entire socioeconomic gradient, and the adverse asthma outcomes observed in African American youth were not limited to the very poor. We also found that the SES index may be a more consistent and useful predictor of poor asthma outcomes than each indicator alone.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906283716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906283716&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/02770903.2014.905593

DO - 10.3109/02770903.2014.905593

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 720

EP - 728

JO - Journal of Asthma

JF - Journal of Asthma

SN - 0277-0903

IS - 7

ER -