Soil-skin adherence from carpet

Use of a mechanical chamber to control contact parameters

Alesia C. Ferguson, Zoran Bursac, Deborah Biddle, Sheire Coleman, Wayne Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between carpet samples laden with soil, and human cadaver skin and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass soil transfer. Mass soil transfers were converted to adherence factors (mg/cm2) for use in models that estimate dermal exposure to contaminants found in soil media. The contact parameters of pressure (10 to 50 kPa) and time (10 to 50 sec) were varied for 369 experiments of mass soil transfer, where two soil types (play sand and lawn soil) and two soil sizes (< 139.7 μm and ≥139.7 < 381) were used. Chamber probes were used to record temperature and humidity. Log transformation of the sand/soil transfers was performed to normalize the distribution. Estimated adjusted means for experimental conditions were exponentiated in order to express them in the original units. Mean soil mass transfer to cadaver skin (0.74 mg/cm2) was higher than to cotton sheets (0.21 mg/cm2). Higher pressure (p < 0.0001), and larger particle size (p < 0.0001) were also all associated with larger amounts of soil transfer. The original model was simplified into two by adherence material type (i.e., cadaver skin and cotton sheets) in order to investigate the differential effects of pressure, time, soil size, and soil type on transfer. This research can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to contaminants found in home carpets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1451-1458
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

Fingerprint

skin
Skin
Soils
soil
cotton
Cotton
soil type
parameter
Sand
Impurities
sand
pollutant
mass transfer
humidity
probe
particle size
Atmospheric humidity
Mass transfer
Particle size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Soil-skin adherence from carpet : Use of a mechanical chamber to control contact parameters. / Ferguson, Alesia C.; Bursac, Zoran; Biddle, Deborah; Coleman, Sheire; Johnson, Wayne.

In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, Vol. 43, No. 12, 01.10.2008, p. 1451-1458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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