Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

To some in the functional school of psychology of the early twentieth century, the theory of evolution gave reason to believe that behavior, as much as morphology and biochemistry, served as means of “fitness.” Thus, instinct became as valid a criterion for fitness as length of a limb, rate of a biochemical reaction, etc. This led to a circularity of reasoning that gave the ammunition to the behaviorist school of psychology to eschew all things innate as concerns behavior. Accordingly, the environment was the sole source of behaviors, including their differences in expression and development. For many years, the environmentalist view of acquisition and development of behavior dominated the discipline of psychology in America. Even today, the mere mention of genes as influencing behavior elicits skepticism. In Europe, behavioral biologists took a more heredity-friendly view of behavior and its development, and a great deal of debate ensued between the groups. A modern synthesis of the best of the thinking on both sides has lent credence to the notions that (1) genes do in fact influence behavior, (2) genes interact with the environment and with each other, and (3) the actions of genes and their interactions are accessible for study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeurobehavioral Genetics
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Applications, Second Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages29-36
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781420003567
ISBN (Print)084931903X, 9780849319037
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multifactorial Inheritance
Genes
Ammunition
Biochemistry
Psychology
Instinct
Heredity
Extremities

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Jones, B. (2006). Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits. In Neurobehavioral Genetics: Methods and Applications, Second Edition (pp. 29-36). CRC Press.

Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits. / Jones, Byron.

Neurobehavioral Genetics: Methods and Applications, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2006. p. 29-36.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Jones, B 2006, Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits. in Neurobehavioral Genetics: Methods and Applications, Second Edition. CRC Press, pp. 29-36.
Jones B. Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits. In Neurobehavioral Genetics: Methods and Applications, Second Edition. CRC Press. 2006. p. 29-36
Jones, Byron. / Some basics, mendelian traits, polygenic traits, complex traits. Neurobehavioral Genetics: Methods and Applications, Second Edition. CRC Press, 2006. pp. 29-36
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