Some Dietary Fibers Increase Elimination of Orally Administered Polychlorinated Biphenyls but Not that of Retinol in Mice

Yasuhiro Kimura, Yasuo Nagatat, Randal Buddington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary fiber supplementation can increase the size and nutrient absorption capacities of the small intestine in some mammals, but does this increase the risk of accumulating environmental contaminants? This study addressed this question by feeding mice diets containing various types of fiber at 0 or 100 g/kg (cellulose, lactosucrose, polydextrose, indigestible dextrin, soy polysaccharide, rice bran and chitosan) for 10 wk. During the final 2 wk, the mice were fed retinol and a dose of Arochlor 1254 [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)] estimated to be 5% of the median lethal dose. Accumulation was determined using whole blood samples collected on days 1, 3 and 7 as well as eight tissues (whole blood, small and large intestine, liver, gall bladder, mesentery, kidney and brain). Elimination of Arochlor 1254 and retinol was determined using daily collections of feces and urine. The patterns of accumulation and elimination differed between Arochlor 1254 and retinol, among tissues, and among mice fed diets with various amounts and types of fiber. Dietary fiber supplementation did not decrease accumulation of PCB. However, the diet with chitosan increased fecal excretion of Arochlor 1254 compared to the fiber-free diet (P < 0.05). The diets with fermentable fiber (polydextrose, indigestible dextrin and soy polysaccharides) increased urinary excretion of PCB compared to the diets with water-insoluble fiber (cellulose, rice bran and chitosan; P < 0.05). The most efficacious diets for minimizing accumulation of environmental contaminants and accelerating elimination likely include a combination of soluble and insoluble fiber, but the specific types, proportions and amounts remain to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-142
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume134
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Dietary Fiber
Vitamin A
polydextrose
Diet
Chitosan
Dietary Supplements
Cellulose
Small Intestine
Polysaccharides
Urine Specimen Collection
Mesentery
Large Intestine
Feces
Mammals
Urinary Bladder
Kidney
Food
Water
Liver

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Some Dietary Fibers Increase Elimination of Orally Administered Polychlorinated Biphenyls but Not that of Retinol in Mice. / Kimura, Yasuhiro; Nagatat, Yasuo; Buddington, Randal.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 134, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 135-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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