Sorption and solubility testing of orthodontic bonding cements in different solutions

Manuel Toledano, Raquel Osorio, Estrella Osorio, Fátima S. Aguilera, Alejandro Romeo, Bianca De La Higuera, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate and compare the solubility and sorption of orthodontic bonding cements after immersion in different solutions, five different cements were used: a fluoride-containing resin composite, a light-cured glass ionomer cement, a light-cured resin composite, a paste-paste chemically cured resin composite, and a liquid-paste chemically cured resin composite. Five different solutions were employed: distilled water, artificial saliva, an alcohol-free mouthrinse solution (Orthokin), a 5% alcohol mouthrinse solution (Perioaid), and a 75% ethanol/water solution. Five disc specimens (15 mm × 0.85 mm) were used for each experimental condition. Materials were handled following manufacturers' instructions and were ground wet with silicon carbide paper. Solubility and sorption of the materials were calculated by means of weighing the samples before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (p < 0.05). The light-cured glass ionomer cement showed the lowest solubility and the highest sorption values. When using alcohol-containing solutions as storage media, solubility of the paste-paste chemically cured resin composite increased, and sorption values for the tested chemically cured resin composites were also increased. The use of alcohol-free mouthrinses does not affect sorption and solubility of orthodontic cements. The chemically cured (paste-paste) composite resin cement, requiring a mixing procedure, was the most affected by immersion in alcohol-containing solutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-256
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

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Adhesive pastes
Composite Resins
Ointments
Sorption
Cements
Resins
Solubility
Alcohols
Composite materials
Testing
Glass Ionomer Cements
Ionomers
Artificial Saliva
Resin Cements
Glass
Water
Weighing
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Fluorides
Silicon carbide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Sorption and solubility testing of orthodontic bonding cements in different solutions. / Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Aguilera, Fátima S.; Romeo, Alejandro; De La Higuera, Bianca; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials, Vol. 76, No. 2, 01.02.2006, p. 251-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toledano, Manuel ; Osorio, Raquel ; Osorio, Estrella ; Aguilera, Fátima S. ; Romeo, Alejandro ; De La Higuera, Bianca ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin. / Sorption and solubility testing of orthodontic bonding cements in different solutions. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials. 2006 ; Vol. 76, No. 2. pp. 251-256.
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