Spatial Relationships among Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Utilization, and Pollution Sources in Neighborhoods of Buffalo, New York

Tonny Oyana, Jamson S. Lwebuga-Mukasa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this retrospective study, the authors investigate the spatial distributions of asthma cases in relation to major traffic corridors and the Peace Bridge Complex in Buffalo, New York, and assess possible contributions of other U.S. Environmental vProtection Agency (U.S. EPA)-identified pollution release sources. Multiple data sources, including emergency room visits, outpatient visits, and hospital discharge databases are utilized to evaluate whether an association exists between the addresses of diagnosed asthma cases and release sources. Using a two-factor multilevel model, this study finds a statistically significant association between proximity to source and diagnosed asthma (p < .025). The authors further observe that two-thirds of the asthmatic sufferers resided between 204 and 700 meters from pollution sources and that over 40 percent who utilized health care lived within walking distance of the health care facility they patronized. Using Turnbull's method, the authors detect notable geographic asthma clusters in areas within the city of Buffalo, in North Tonawanda, along major roadways, and in the communities adjoining the Peace Bridge Complex. The authors also find local clusters in Buffalo's west side using Turnbull's method, and a significant global cluster using Besag and Newell's method. One-quarter of the case address locations were within 700 meters of identified clusters. The Score Test methods of Lawson and Waller and of Bithell also find statistically significant associations between three previously identified U.S. EPA focus sites and increased risk of asthma. Correlation of these findings with air quality assessments, especially with respect to traffic-related pollution, however, would be required for a definitive link to be made between an increased risk of asthma and identified pollution sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-37
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Environmental Health
Volume66
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
asthma
Buffaloes
pollutant source
Health care
health care
Pollution
Asthma
Emergency rooms
Air quality
Spatial distribution
Delivery of Health Care
pollution
Information Storage and Retrieval
Health Facilities
walking
Walking
Hospital Emergency Service
air quality
Outpatients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Spatial Relationships among Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Utilization, and Pollution Sources in Neighborhoods of Buffalo, New York. / Oyana, Tonny; Lwebuga-Mukasa, Jamson S.

In: Journal of Environmental Health, Vol. 66, No. 8, 01.04.2004, p. 25-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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