Special treatments in epilepsy

Kevin Chapman, James Wheless

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Seizure disorders represent a frequently occurring neurologic problem. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are the primary treatment modality and provide good seizure control in most patients; however, more than 25% of children and adults with seizure disorders either have intractable seizures or suffer significant adverse effects secondary to medications. A limited number will benefit from surgical therapy. The shortcomings of antiepileptic drug therapy have allowed alternative treatments to emerge. In this chapter, three specific and unique treatments of special interest to the epileptologist are reviewed (pyridoxine, acetazolamide, and magnesium sulfate).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEpilepsy
Subtitle of host publicationMechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives
PublisherCRC Press
Pages381-406
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781420085600
ISBN (Print)9781420085594
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Anticonvulsants
Seizures
Magnesium Sulfate
Pyridoxine
Acetazolamide
Therapeutics
Nervous System
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chapman, K., & Wheless, J. (2010). Special treatments in epilepsy. In Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives (pp. 381-406). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420085594

Special treatments in epilepsy. / Chapman, Kevin; Wheless, James.

Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives. CRC Press, 2010. p. 381-406.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chapman, K & Wheless, J 2010, Special treatments in epilepsy. in Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives. CRC Press, pp. 381-406. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420085594
Chapman K, Wheless J. Special treatments in epilepsy. In Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives. CRC Press. 2010. p. 381-406 https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420085594
Chapman, Kevin ; Wheless, James. / Special treatments in epilepsy. Epilepsy: Mechanisms, Models, and Translational Perspectives. CRC Press, 2010. pp. 381-406
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