Spectrin (βSpIIΣ1) is an essential component of synaptic transmission

Aleksander F. Sikorski, José Sangerman, Steven Goodman, Stuart D. Critz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cellular mechanism that underlies the regulated release of synaptic vesicles during neurotransmission is not fully known. Our previous data has shown that brain spectrin (αSpIIΣ1/βSpIIΣ1)2 is localized in axons and nerve terminals and we have shown that the β subunit (βSpIIΣ1) contains a synapsin-binding domain capable of interacting with synapsin and small synaptic vesicles in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggested a role for brain β-spectrin in synaptic neurotransmission. To examine this possibility further, peptide-specific antibodies directed against epitopes within the synapsin-binding domain of brain β-spectrin, or against flanking regions, were injected into the presynaptic neuron of synaptically paired rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Here, we show that the antibodies directed against the synapsin-binding domain specifically blocked synaptic neurotransmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-166
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Research
Volume852
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Synapsins
Spectrin
Synaptic Transmission
Synaptic Vesicles
Brain
Neurons
Antibodies
Presynaptic Terminals
Epitopes
Peptides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Spectrin (βSpIIΣ1) is an essential component of synaptic transmission. / Sikorski, Aleksander F.; Sangerman, José; Goodman, Steven; Critz, Stuart D.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 852, No. 1, 03.01.2000, p. 161-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sikorski, Aleksander F. ; Sangerman, José ; Goodman, Steven ; Critz, Stuart D. / Spectrin (βSpIIΣ1) is an essential component of synaptic transmission. In: Brain Research. 2000 ; Vol. 852, No. 1. pp. 161-166.
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