Speech delay in seven siblings with unusual sound preferences.

N. T. Radford, B. Gentry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

By the age of 8 years, children who are developing normally show almost adult speech skills. Children with serious phonological disorders, however, may exhibit significant differences in development well beyond the age of 8 years with little or no improvement in speech if therapy is not provided. This is a descriptive study of seven siblings, ranging in age from 6 to 14 years of age who had never attended school or received speech therapy until these ages. All of the children exhibited moderate to severe speech disorder with no evidence of predisposing genetic factors, hearing loss, physical abuse, or prenatal drug exposure. These cases, which would obviously be impossible to duplicate in a controlled study, provide strong support for the efficacy of speech therapy. Children with serious speech delays will not improve appreciably without direct intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1067-1072
Number of pages6
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume85
Issue number3 Pt 1
StatePublished - Dec 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Language Development Disorders
Speech Therapy
Siblings
Speech Disorders
Hearing Loss
Causality
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Speech delay in seven siblings with unusual sound preferences. / Radford, N. T.; Gentry, B.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 85, No. 3 Pt 1, 12.1997, p. 1067-1072.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7dac913effb44f83b55a4e210dc2f8de,
title = "Speech delay in seven siblings with unusual sound preferences.",
abstract = "By the age of 8 years, children who are developing normally show almost adult speech skills. Children with serious phonological disorders, however, may exhibit significant differences in development well beyond the age of 8 years with little or no improvement in speech if therapy is not provided. This is a descriptive study of seven siblings, ranging in age from 6 to 14 years of age who had never attended school or received speech therapy until these ages. All of the children exhibited moderate to severe speech disorder with no evidence of predisposing genetic factors, hearing loss, physical abuse, or prenatal drug exposure. These cases, which would obviously be impossible to duplicate in a controlled study, provide strong support for the efficacy of speech therapy. Children with serious speech delays will not improve appreciably without direct intervention.",
author = "Radford, {N. T.} and B. Gentry",
year = "1997",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "1067--1072",
journal = "Perceptual and Motor Skills",
issn = "0031-5125",
publisher = "Ammons Scientific Ltd",
number = "3 Pt 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Speech delay in seven siblings with unusual sound preferences.

AU - Radford, N. T.

AU - Gentry, B.

PY - 1997/12

Y1 - 1997/12

N2 - By the age of 8 years, children who are developing normally show almost adult speech skills. Children with serious phonological disorders, however, may exhibit significant differences in development well beyond the age of 8 years with little or no improvement in speech if therapy is not provided. This is a descriptive study of seven siblings, ranging in age from 6 to 14 years of age who had never attended school or received speech therapy until these ages. All of the children exhibited moderate to severe speech disorder with no evidence of predisposing genetic factors, hearing loss, physical abuse, or prenatal drug exposure. These cases, which would obviously be impossible to duplicate in a controlled study, provide strong support for the efficacy of speech therapy. Children with serious speech delays will not improve appreciably without direct intervention.

AB - By the age of 8 years, children who are developing normally show almost adult speech skills. Children with serious phonological disorders, however, may exhibit significant differences in development well beyond the age of 8 years with little or no improvement in speech if therapy is not provided. This is a descriptive study of seven siblings, ranging in age from 6 to 14 years of age who had never attended school or received speech therapy until these ages. All of the children exhibited moderate to severe speech disorder with no evidence of predisposing genetic factors, hearing loss, physical abuse, or prenatal drug exposure. These cases, which would obviously be impossible to duplicate in a controlled study, provide strong support for the efficacy of speech therapy. Children with serious speech delays will not improve appreciably without direct intervention.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031466086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031466086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 1067

EP - 1072

JO - Perceptual and Motor Skills

JF - Perceptual and Motor Skills

SN - 0031-5125

IS - 3 Pt 1

ER -